Be a part of the ITP community and stay informed.
Login to your account or REGISTER
.

•  Web site Help & Info

Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC:

GMO's 7 years 2 weeks ago #52025

  • Sandi
  • Offline
  • Sandi Forum Moderator Diagnosed in 1998, currently in remission. Diagnosed with Lupus in 2006. Last Count - 344k - 6-9-18
  • Posts: 12436
  • Karma: 11
  • Thank you received: 2371
From the New England Journal of Medicine:

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not high on most physicians' worry lists. If we think at all about biotechnology, most of us probably focus on direct threats to human health, such as prospects for converting pathogens to biologic weapons or the implications of new technologies for editing the human germline. But while those debates simmer, the application of biotechnology to agriculture has been rapid and aggressive. The vast majority of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States are now genetically engineered. Foods produced from GM crops have become ubiquitous. And unlike regulatory bodies in 64 other countries, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not require labeling of GM foods.

Two recent developments are dramatically changing the GMO landscape. First, there have been sharp increases in the amounts and numbers of chemical herbicides applied to GM crops, and still further increases — the largest in a generation — are scheduled to occur in the next few years. Second, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified glyphosate, the herbicide most widely used on GM crops, as a “probable human carcinogen”1 and classified a second herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as a “possible human carcinogen.”2

The application of genetic engineering to agriculture builds on the ancient practice of selective breeding. But unlike traditional selective breeding, genetic engineering vastly expands the range of traits that can be moved into plants and enables breeders to import DNA from virtually anywhere in the biosphere. Depending on the traits selected, genetically engineered crops can increase yields, thrive when irrigated with salty water, or produce fruits and vegetables resistant to mold and rot.

The National Academy of Sciences has twice reviewed the safety of GM crops — in 2000 and 2004.3 Those reviews, which focused almost entirely on the genetic aspects of biotechnology, concluded that GM crops pose no unique hazards to human health. They noted that genetic transformation has the potential to produce unanticipated allergens or toxins and might alter the nutritional quality of food. Both reports recommended development of new risk-assessment tools and postmarketing surveillance. Those recommendations have largely gone unheeded.

Herbicide resistance is the main characteristic that the biotechnology industry has chosen to introduce into plants. Corn and soybeans with genetically engineered tolerance to glyphosate (Roundup) were first introduced in the mid-1990s. These “Roundup-Ready” crops now account for more than 90% of the corn and soybeans planted in the United States.4 Their advantage, especially in the first years after introduction, is that they greatly simplify weed management. Farmers can spray herbicide both before and during the growing season, leaving their crops unharmed.

But widespread adoption of herbicide-resistant crops has led to overreliance on herbicides and, in particular, on glyphosate.5 In the United States, glyphosate use has increased by a factor of more than 250 — from 0.4 million kg in 1974 to 113 million kg in 2014. Global use has increased by a factor of more than 10. Not surprisingly, glyphosate-resistant weeds have emerged and are found today on nearly 100 million acres in 36 states. Fields must now be treated with multiple herbicides, including 2,4-D, a component of the Agent Orange defoliant used in the Vietnam War.

The first of the two developments that raise fresh concerns about the safety of GM crops is a 2014 decision by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to approve Enlist Duo, a new combination herbicide comprising glyphosate plus 2,4-D. Enlist Duo was formulated to combat herbicide resistance. It will be marketed in tandem with newly approved seeds genetically engineered to resist glyphosate, 2,4-D, and multiple other herbicides. The EPA anticipates that a 3-to-7-fold increase in 2,4-D use will result.

In our view, the science and the risk assessment supporting the Enlist Duo decision are flawed. The science consisted solely of toxicologic studies commissioned by the herbicide manufacturers in the 1980s and 1990s and never published, not an uncommon practice in U.S. pesticide regulation. These studies predated current knowledge of low-dose, endocrine-mediated, and epigenetic effects and were not designed to detect them. The risk assessment gave little consideration to potential health effects in infants and children, thus contravening federal pesticide law. It failed to consider ecologic impact, such as effects on the monarch butterfly and other pollinators. It considered only pure glyphosate, despite studies showing that formulated glyphosate that contains surfactants and adjuvants is more toxic than the pure compound.

The second new development is the determination by the IARC in 2015 that glyphosate is a “probable human carcinogen”1 and 2,4-D a “possible human carcinogen.”2 These classifications were based on comprehensive assessments of the toxicologic and epidemiologic literature that linked both herbicides to dose-related increases in malignant tumors at multiple anatomical sites in animals and linked glyphosate to an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in humans.

These developments suggest that GM foods and the herbicides applied to them may pose hazards to human health that were not examined in previous assessments. We believe that the time has therefore come to thoroughly reconsider all aspects of the safety of plant biotechnology. The National Academy of Sciences has convened a new committee to reassess the social, economic, environmental, and human health effects of GM crops. This development is welcome, but the committee's report is not expected until at least 2016.

In the meantime, we offer two recommendations. First, we believe the EPA should delay implementation of its decision to permit use of Enlist Duo. This decision was made in haste. It was based on poorly designed and outdated studies and on an incomplete assessment of human exposure and environmental effects. It would have benefited from deeper consideration of independently funded studies published in the peer-reviewed literature. And it preceded the recent IARC determinations on glyphosate and 2,4-D. Second, the National Toxicology Program should urgently assess the toxicology of pure glyphosate, formulated glyphosate, and mixtures of glyphosate and other herbicides.

Finally, we believe the time has come to revisit the United States' reluctance to label GM foods. Labeling will deliver multiple benefits. It is essential for tracking emergence of novel food allergies and assessing effects of chemical herbicides applied to GM crops. It would respect the wishes of a growing number of consumers who insist they have a right to know what foods they are buying and how they were produced. And the argument that there is nothing new about genetic rearrangement misses the point that GM crops are now the agricultural products most heavily treated with herbicides and that two of these herbicides may pose risks of cancer. We hope, in light of this new information, that the FDA will reconsider labeling of GM foods and couple it with adequately funded, long-term postmarketing surveillance.

www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1505660
The following user(s) said Thank You: ananta

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

GMO's 7 years 2 weeks ago #52026

  • Melinda
  • Melinda's Avatar
Finally, we believe the time has come to revisit the United States' reluctance to label GM foods.
IF they would label the GM foods as being GM then I would steer clear of them!

This is scary too
www.nytimes.com/2015/11/20/business/genetically-engineered-salmon-approved-for-consumption.html?_r=4

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

GMO's 7 years 2 weeks ago #52027

  • Sandi
  • Offline
  • Sandi Forum Moderator Diagnosed in 1998, currently in remission. Diagnosed with Lupus in 2006. Last Count - 344k - 6-9-18
  • Posts: 12436
  • Karma: 11
  • Thank you received: 2371
Yeah, and it's too bad that it had to actually come from a 'legit' medical journal for it to be taken seriously. Other studies and groups have been saying it for years but they don't count. If they do have to label it, I bet they change the language from "GMO" to something that people don't recognize. Or, they will sneak it in to other products.

This is about Chipotle:

Even big food companies are moving to take genetically modified ingredients, or G.M.O.s, out of their products or to label products so that consumers know which are free of them.

Chipotle’s announcement does not mean that the restaurant will be entirely G.M.O.-free. The company acknowledges that some of the soft drinks it sells are likely to contain sweeteners made from G.M.O. corn, and that some of its meat and dairy supplies come from animals fed G.M.O. grains.

www.nytimes.com/2015/04/27/business/chipotle-to-stop-serving-genetically-altered-food.html?_r=0

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

GMO's 7 years 1 week ago #52033

  • ananta
  • Offline
  • Posts: 178
  • Thank you received: 24
Thank you Sandi for bringing this up. I think most Americans are unaware of the true dangers of GMO's and glyphosate.

Monsanto is now facing a lot of lawsuits over their RoundUp product.

From France: www.truth-out.org/news/item/6794

In Los Angeles: www.globalresearch.ca/lawsuit-accuses-monsanto-of-lying-about-safety-of-roundup/5444984

Brazil wants to ban it: naturalsociety.com/brazils-public-prosecutor-wants-to-ban-monsantos-chemicals/

In Delaware: www.cnbc.com/2015/10/15/reuters-america-us-lawsuits-build-against-monsanto-over-alleged-roundup-cancer-link.html

Here is a law firm's website with a lot of info on glyphosate:
www.dmlawfirm.com/monsanto-lawsuit

Scary stuff.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

GMO's 7 years 1 week ago #52034

  • Sandi
  • Offline
  • Sandi Forum Moderator Diagnosed in 1998, currently in remission. Diagnosed with Lupus in 2006. Last Count - 344k - 6-9-18
  • Posts: 12436
  • Karma: 11
  • Thank you received: 2371
Until a few months ago, I was not aware either. I'd heard the term, but had no idea what GMO's were. Now that I do know, it's scary and I try to avoid products that include them. The thing is, it's hidden in pretty much everything. It's nearly impossible to escape it.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

GMO's 7 years 1 week ago #52040

  • ananta
  • Offline
  • Posts: 178
  • Thank you received: 24
It's not impossible, but you do need to avoid most things that are packaged. It helps if you do you own cooking. And constantly read labels.

First organic, by definition is non-GMO. So you are safe with organics.
Avoid:
any corn or corn products like corn syrup, corn starch, corn oil, fruit sugar,(the new name for corn syrup) dextrose and maltodextrose (usually made from corn) but popcorn is OK.
any soy or soy products
any sugar unless marked "cane sugar"
canola and cottonseed oil, vegetable oil (usually soy)
salmon - GMO fish has just been approved
papaya from Hawaii, so if you live on the west coast, you probably are getting GMO papaya, but the East coast gets it from the Caribbean which is safe.
GMO potatoes are just hitting the market. I don't think they are widely available right now. They don't turn brown after cutting for quite a few hours.
there is some yellow squash and zuchini, but not many farmers are growing it.

Luckily the NON-GMO verified seal is making life easier. They put their symbol on all products that have been verified as non GMO by their independent verification program. It is a blue box with Non-GMO written and a butterfly. Here is their website: www.nongmoproject.org/
They have verified thousands of products.

Just recently I see that Lay's Simple potato chips have been labeled. That is a GREAT sign. If big manufacturers take note that the public wants non GMO, they will reject GMO ingredients. And they are taking note: Here is an article in the Wall Street Journal:
www.wsj.com/articles/the-gmo-fight-ripples-down-the-food-chain-1407465378

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

GMO's 7 years 1 week ago #52041

  • Sandi
  • Offline
  • Sandi Forum Moderator Diagnosed in 1998, currently in remission. Diagnosed with Lupus in 2006. Last Count - 344k - 6-9-18
  • Posts: 12436
  • Karma: 11
  • Thank you received: 2371
It's even in soda! I'm sure it's hiding in many other things.

I'm pretty sure I have gluten-sensitivity. When I stopped eating gluten for 3 months, it made a big difference in how I felt. I also can't eat nightshades because they cause a lot of inflammation. I found that out when I started drinking tomato juice two years ago. Worst inflammation I ever had. I also have high cholesterol, high blood pressure and am pre-diabetic, so I have to watch that. I think I'm left with lettuce....

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Page:
  • 1

Charity NavigatorGuideStar Seal NORD Member BadgeTHSNA logo