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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31365

  • ktaruba
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I have recently been reading about sugar being linked to autoimune deseases. I am confused about the kinds of sugar. So obviuosly refined is bad such as soda and candy bars. But what about the sugar that is found in fruit? Whole natural fruit? What exactly is the bad sugar?

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31366

  • Sandi
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And I have been reading that salt is linked to autoimmune disorders, as well as gluten and dairy. Nightshades promote inflammation which is not good for autoimmune disorders. I guess if we don't eat anything, we'll all be healthy.

Sorry for the sarcasm. I am really struggling with this. There are no real answers. I'm sure someone can help you out with the sugar. As far as I know, fruit is fine if you don't have a fructose sensitivity.

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31368

  • eklein
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For me, fruit sugar is linked to my autoimmune disease. I have fructose malabsorption, fruit sugar results in chronic intestinal inflammation which makes my autoimmune disease worse.

I think you have to consider your individual situation and what makes you sick or well. I don't have any problems with table sugar but I can't use unrefined sugar. Apples make me very sick. Weird, huh?
Erica
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Diagnosed May 2005, lowest count 8K.
4/22/08: 43K (2nd Rituxan)
10/01/09: 246K, 1/8/10: 111K, 5/21/10: 233K
Latest count: 7/27/2015: 194K

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31370

  • lili
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Well, Sandy, you may not be aware of this, but there is some evidence that if you severely restrict food (i.e. starve), then you can extend your life. At least this works for fruit flies and mice. And it's significant. I think the animals live 30% longer. But you have to really stick to a diet that is just above starvation. You have restrict your food intake enough that you lose your ability to reproduce. In men, that means they stop making sperm and women stop producing eggs and having periods.

Personally, I like my food too much. I find it hard enough to do even the most simple diet, so there's no way I'd attempt this. Ya gotta live life a little.

:)

Lily

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31372

  • alicein
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To answer the original question - refined sugars are not good for anyone. *If* you're going to use sugar in cooking, canning, etc. it's always best to use organic unrefined sugar simply because that is what is closer to it's natural form then bleached white sugar. It is an off color (not brown but not bleached white). Unbleached sugars come in a variety of types and each has its own merits. Turbinado, sucanat, evaporated cane juice (another name for unbleached, minimally processed sugar cane), etc. I believe that sucanat is considered to be the closest to actual cane sugar but don't quote me on that.

Fructose is treated differently by the body then glucose. Our body cells run on glucose. We will convert fructose to glucose and not store it as fat so long as we don't overdo it. In life, the truth of "all things in moderation" applies to ANY type of sugar. Fructose or glucose. But we do need them. It is a balance that is important to our overall health. In general, if you get two veggie servings for every fruit serving then you are "balanced" in terms of fructose. The reality is, most of us will eat lots of fruit and little veggies (save vegetarians who tend to get more veggies then the rest of us). Even with my own family I have to WORK at balancing out the fruits and veggies. In general, most people don't have to worry about not getting enough fructose or glucose, they need to worry about getting way too much. My personal rule is I will not use more then 1 ten pound bag of organic cane sugar (or any other sugar for that matter!) per YEAR for my family of 5. That may still be too much, I've never technically sat down and figured out how much that is per person, but to me, it seemed better then where we were ten years ago. That does NOT count my summer canning which I use minimal sugar for as well. So baking, cooking, coffee, etc. we try to minimize where we can. Sugar negatively affects the immune system. That much we do know. They have done many many studies that show sugar feeds diseases/cancers. So I would say if someone is dealing with health issues that avoiding sugar is best and what you do have, use as close to nature as possible (which means whole fruit and/or minimally processed cane sugar).

That said, I want to address Sandi's frustration. The problem with "diets" as I see it (after way too many years of having to adjust family diets for health) is there is no one size fits all. Erica knows she cannot have fructose. The next guy might find out he's diabetic and needs to watch his glucose consumption/conversion foods. For the average person that is healthy with no major issues, eating a varied, whole foods diet is always best. Eating a little bit of everything that God created because there are nutrients to be had in all of it. God did not create pop tarts! LOL!! The key here is as close to its natural form as possible. Regular rice vs. minute rice. Etc. etc.

When someone does have health issues you have to look at the individual issue and then evaluate what foods will help or hurt that person. In Sandi's case, joint/muscle pain inflammation is known to be aggravated by nightshades. So for her, avoiding those things could be very healthful and helpful in the long run. For me, it would make no difference. Every person has to evaluate their health on this basis.

Hippocrates said, "let food be thy medicine and medicine thy food." There is great wisdom in that.

Don't worry about what "everyone" says you (generically) should eat. Evaluate the need based on your personal circumstances. I have yet to find a "diet" of any sort that applies to each and every person. It can't happen. We are individuals. However, I do believe there are "groups" of people (ie. disease types, etc.) that can benefit from similar changes as people have learned what effects their pain, inflammation, etc.

So Sandi, evaluate your food based on YOUR body's specific need overall. When you eat, listen to your body and notice what it does. You will quickly figure out what makes you feel better and what makes you feel worse. Then you adjust. You may be fine eating gluten but not nightshades. Personally, while not allergic to gluten, it doesn't make me feel good, so I don't eat it. Perhaps your research on what to eat should center on foods specific to lupus since both RA and lupus are diseases of specific inflammation. Narrow your criteria and don't be too broad.

Hope this helps.

patti

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31373

  • ktaruba
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Wow thanks Patti! Makes a lot of sense! Maybe the next step is to have my son tested for food sensitivities. In the mean time I was trying to eliminate the refined products. I try to make everything from scratch and avoid processed food.
I was just not sure about the fruit sugars. I like your approach to 2 vegies to 1 fruit! How about stivia? Any opinion on that? For like oatmeal or ice tea, not to bake with.
Thanks for everyones reply!

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31374

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Erice do you know that you sensitive to fruit sugar through testing or just knowing your body?

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31375

  • eklein
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First I noticed that I had problem with certain foods like apples. Then I saw a gastro doctor and had a colonoscopy to rule out other stuff (plus I was 50) and had a breath test to diagnose fructose malabsorption. The breath test was positive.
Erica
And she was!
Diagnosed May 2005, lowest count 8K.
4/22/08: 43K (2nd Rituxan)
10/01/09: 246K, 1/8/10: 111K, 5/21/10: 233K
Latest count: 7/27/2015: 194K
The following user(s) said Thank You: ktaruba

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31377

  • Sandi
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Lili:

Last time I checked, I wasn't a fruit fly or a mouse, but I've already lost my ability to reproduce, so that's not a concern. :cheer:

The problem is, I have to make some sort of diet lifestyle change so that I can live a little. Lupus and RA, plus the medications, have destroyed my body so much that I cannot live a normal life. I've pretty much exhausted all medical treatments, except for the harsher ones like Enbrel and Benlysta. I won't try those because every time I have done a harsh treatment (Rituxan and Methotrexate), it causes more damage.

My lungs are damaged from Methotrexate. My finger joints are swollen and I'm losing dexterity in my hands. My muscles are so weak that I can't carry anything and can barely walk up stairs. I recently had some cognitive testing and did not do well. Some days, showering and going to the bank is all I can manage in a day. I avoid social situations because conversations totally wipe me out. Joint and muscle pain are debilitating. My balance and coordination are off. I have to do something. Anything.

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31379

  • Sandi
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Patti:

I have given up nightshades. That is the one thing that I know did cause harm. I do eat a lot of fruits and vegetables. I think I need to work on gluten and sugar also. Sugar will be the hardest. I love my iced tea and do use a minimal amount, but it's my absolute favorite drink. I have always hated water and never drank it. I did recently discover a way that I can enjoy it though. I freeze juice and make ice cubes, then put them in the water. I am actually loving it! I try to be careful about the juice I buy and please! No one start telling me that tap water is bad. I do think gluten might be a problem and need to know for sure, so I will have to give that up too eventually.

It's really hard for me to tell what works and what does not, like I said before, many things affect how I feel. The weather, stress, doing too much, doing too little, too much sleep, not enough sleep....blah blah blah. I never know from one day to the next what I will wake up to the next day.

What do you think about rice?

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31380

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Maybe I haven't read back far enough, maybe we call them something else in the UK......maybe I am just ignorant? Will someone tell me what a nightshade is please????? (just curiosity!)

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31381

  • grasshopper
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Glad you've asked that question Alison. I thought I was being stupid not knowing what a nightshade is! It sounds like some sort of lamp but I'm guessing if you had been eating those it would cause more problems than what your talking about!!

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31384

  • eklein
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Nightshades are a family of plants, the foods include peppers, tomatos and eggplants. Sandi is that all of them?
Erica
And she was!
Diagnosed May 2005, lowest count 8K.
4/22/08: 43K (2nd Rituxan)
10/01/09: 246K, 1/8/10: 111K, 5/21/10: 233K
Latest count: 7/27/2015: 194K

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31386

  • alicein
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eklein wrote: Nightshades are a family of plants, the foods include peppers, tomatos and eggplants. Sandi is that all of them?
Erica


Potatoes, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, eggplant, tomatillos, tamarios, pepinos, pimentos, paprika, and cayenne peppers are classified as nightshade foods. The ones that tend to cause inflammation in people are the potatoes and tomatoes. Too a lesser degree peppers. That seems to be individual though. In general, people dealing with RA/lupus/inflammation disorders are better to avoid them all for at least a period of time to allow their bodies to heal a little bit.

Sandi, you are doing the right thing right now. Do your very best to limit sugar and avoid the nightshades. Allow yourself to enjoy your drink once a day or you won't stick to anything. You can always adjust that later. I started drinking water EXACTLY the way you are! I could not stand it straight so did the juice thing in it for awhile. Eventually, I did not need the juice flavor even a little bit anymore. So do it until you don't need it anymore. Some is better then none. Baby steps......

As for rice - rice is good for you. Basmati (white or brown) is preferable but rice is not bad. What *can* turn rice to bad is when someone is gluten free and they use rice/rice flour as a substitute for everything. This sets it up to become an allergy eventually. It's better to use a mixture of rice, quinoa and millet so you get the variety of nutrients from each them. Spread between the three of those will be much more broad nutrition comparable to whole wheat then just rice alone. Rice from a box doesn't count. :)

I have a friend who has a 5yr old boy with JRA. He's had it since before he was two. They use a combination of diet and low dose methotrexate while using homeopathy to do the overall healing. He's been able to cut his meth in half and is still healing. There doesn't have to be one answer to healing, you can use multiple modes of healing and you might want to seriously consider homeopathy as one of those modes. We still use a healthy diet as the basis for healthy bodies and h-pathy for what ailes us otherwise (colds, flus, ITP, etc).

But overall, make small diet changes first. Let yourself see the difference over a period of months and then decide if you can make another small change. You will not stick to anything if you try it all at once. Tape Hippocrates statement about food somewhere in your kitchen as a reminder that the choices you're making are to heal your body, not just feed the soul.

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31387

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Thanks. My husband (the gardener of the family) clearly isn't as ignorant as me - he says potatoes are also part of that family

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31388

  • alicein
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ktaruba wrote: Wow thanks Patti! Makes a lot of sense! Maybe the next step is to have my son tested for food sensitivities. In the mean time I was trying to eliminate the refined products. I try to make everything from scratch and avoid processed food.
I was just not sure about the fruit sugars. I like your approach to 2 vegies to 1 fruit! How about stivia? Any opinion on that? For like oatmeal or ice tea, not to bake with.
Thanks for everyones reply!


Stevia is an herb that has a "sweet" taste to it (sort of!). It is fine to use in drinks, foods, etc. Some people like it's taste, others do not. For a long time I used the Sweet Leaf Stevia flavors to flavor my coffee (wow! One drop will do ya). The variety of flavors is appealing to coffee drinkers especially. Personally, I'm not a fan of stevia and finally gave it up for xylitol in my coffee. But yes, it's fine to use as you asked. And far better then regular sugar if you had to put them on a scale and weigh the differences.

patti

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31390

  • Sandi
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Yeah, Patti got the complete list. Tomatos and potatos are my favorite. VERY hard to do. But two weeks ago, I read about benefits of cayenne pepper and began to add that to a big glass of V-8 every day. The entire week, I had so much inflammation I couldn't move. I didn't get the connection at first, but when I did, I stopped drinking it and things improved a bit.

I am doing other things, slowly. I am going to make an appointment for acupuncture. I have also downloaded some guided self-meditation albums on my iPod. I am going to try to meditate twice a day to reduce stress. My son also found me a stretching/breathing yoga exercise on On Demand. I am going to try that every day also.

Time to try to take back my body and my life.

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31393

  • alicein
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Sandi wrote: Yeah, Patti got the complete list. Tomatos and potatos are my favorite. VERY hard to do. But two weeks ago, I read about benefits of cayenne pepper and began to add that to a big glass of V-8 every day. The entire week, I had so much inflammation I couldn't move. I didn't get the connection at first, but when I did, I stopped drinking it and things improved a bit.

I am doing other things, slowly. I am going to make an appointment for acupuncture. I have also downloaded some guided self-meditation albums on my iPod. I am going to try to meditate twice a day to reduce stress. My son also found me a stretching/breathing yoga exercise on On Demand. I am going to try that every day also.

Time to try to take back my body and my life.



These are all such good things! I really like acupuncture. You may find it very helpful for your pain and stiffness. Keep us posted on how things go as you add them. Give it time. Nothing ever works quickly (drugs or natural!) so be patient and allow your body time to heal a bit.

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Sugar 6 years 11 months ago #31398

  • Sandi
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I was born without patience and belong to the instant gratification generation!

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Sugar 6 years 1 week ago #39754

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One of the things I did a couple of years ago was eliminate sugar in a big way from my diet. That's not to say that I never have any, but there are many things you can do to minimize your intake. It takes a big dose of discipline though. There is no question that this has been one of many things that's helped improve my overall health. Read the article below and you get a good sense of why.

addendum:

Through personal experience, I've proved out the theories in this video to my own satisfaction. The strict diet I went on in 2011 for about 8 months was a no gluten, no sugar, no alcohol, no caffeine diet. Within 3 months of starting this diet my cholesterol dropped from the 7s (I was on Crestor), to 4.1 (and no Crestor). My blood pressure dropped and I cut my betablocker dose from 10 mg to 5 mg ( I had been on 10 mg for about 10 years prior). I was a bit overweight and I lost over 10 lbs (all the while on prednisone - which increases weight in most users). The other noteworthy thing is that the low sugar consumption helped me feel "normal" despite being on prednisone - it minimzed the side effects tremendously. I intepret this as the liver being better able to breakdown the prednisone in my body as I was taking it. All these things are liver related ...


And ..."As a result, the World Health Organisation is set to recommend a cut in the amount of sugar in our diets from 22 teaspoons per day to almost half that." Are you kidding me. 22??? That has to be a misprint.



The man who tried to warn us about sugar
By Julia Llewellyn Smith, The Daily Telegraph
February 13, 2014

A growing number of scientists are convinced sugar is the cause of several chronic and very common illnesses, including heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes.
A couple of years ago, an out-of-print book published in 1972 by a long-dead British professor suddenly became a collector’s item. Copies that had been lying dusty on bookshelves were selling for hundreds of pounds, while copies were also being pirated online.
Alongside such rarities as Madonna’s Sex, Stephen King’s Rage (written as Richard Bachman) and Promise Me Tomorrow by Nora Roberts; Pure, White and Deadly by John Yudkin, a book widely derided at the time of publication, was listed as one of the most coveted out-of-print works in the world.
How exactly did a long-forgotten book suddenly become so prized? The cause was a ground-breaking lecture called Sugar: the Bitter Truth by Robert Lustig, professor of paediatric endocrinology at the University of California, in which Lustig hailed Yudkin’s work as "prophetic".
Watch: Sugar: The Bitter Truth with Robert Lustig

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

"Without even knowing it, I was a Yudkin acolyte," says Lustig, who tracked down the book after a tip from a colleague via an interlibrary loan. "Everything this man said in 1972 was the God’s honest truth and if you want to read a true prophecy you find this book… I’m telling you every single thing this guy said has come to pass. I’m in awe."
Posted on YouTube in 2009, Lustig’s 90-minute talk has received 4.1 million hits and is credited with kick-starting the anti-sugar movement, a campaign that calls for sugar to be treated as a toxin, like alcohol and tobacco, and for sugar-laden foods to be taxed, labelled with health warnings and banned for anyone under 18.
Lustig is one of a growing number of scientists who don’t just believe sugar makes you fat and rots teeth. They’re convinced it’s the cause of several chronic and very common illnesses, including heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes. It’s also addictive, since it interferes with our appetites and creates an irresistible urge to eat.
This year, Lustig’s message has gone mainstream; many of the New Year diet books focused not on fat or carbohydrates, but on cutting out sugar and the everyday foods (soups, fruit juices, bread) that contain high levels of sucrose. The anti-sugar camp is not celebrating yet, however. They know what happened to Yudkin and what a ruthless and unscrupulous adversary the sugar industry proved to be.
The tale begins in the Sixties. That decade, nutritionists in university laboratories all over America and Western Europe were scrabbling to work out the reasons for an alarming rise in heart disease levels. By 1970, there were 520 deaths per 100,000 per year in England and Wales caused by coronary heart disease and 700 per 100,000 in America. After a while, a consensus emerged: the culprit was the high level of fat in our diets.
One scientist in particular grabbed the headlines: a nutritionist from the University of Minnesota called Ancel Keys. Keys, famous for inventing the K-ration - 12,000 calories packed in a little box for use by troops during the Second World War - declared fat to be public enemy number one and recommended that anyone who was worried about heart disease should switch to a low-fat "Mediterranean" diet.
Instead of treating the findings as a threat, the food industry spied an opportunity. Market research showed there was a great deal of public enthusiasm for "healthy" products and low-fat foods would prove incredibly popular. By the start of the Seventies, supermarket shelves were awash with low-fat yogurts, spreads, and even desserts and biscuits.
But, amid this new craze, one voice stood out in opposition. John Yudkin, founder of the nutrition department at the University of London’s Queen Elizabeth College, had been doing his own experiments and, instead of laying the blame at the door of fat, he claimed there was a much clearer correlation between the rise in heart disease and a rise in the consumption of sugar. Rodents, chickens, rabbits, pigs and students fed sugar and carbohydrates, he said, invariably showed raised blood levels of triglycerides (a technical term for fat), which was then, as now, considered a risk factor for heart disease. Sugar also raised insulin levels, linking it directly to type 2 diabetes.
Factsheet: Type 2 diabetes
When he outlined these results in Pure, White and Deadly, in 1972, he questioned whether there was any causal link at all between fat and heart disease. After all, he said, we had been eating substances like butter for centuries, while sugar, had, up until the 1850s, been something of a rare treat for most people. "If only a small fraction of what we know about the effects of sugar were to be revealed in -relation to any other material used as a food additive," he wrote, "that material would promptly be banned."
This was not what the food industry wanted to hear. When devising their low-fat products, manufacturers had needed a fat substitute to stop the food tasting like cardboard, and they had plumped for sugar. The new "healthy" foods were low-fat but had sugar by the spoonful and Yudkin’s findings threatened to disrupt a very profitable business.
As a result, says Lustig, there was a concerted campaign by the food industry and several scientists to discredit Yudkin’s work. The most vocal critic was Ancel Keys.
Keys loathed Yudkin and, even before Pure, White and Deadly appeared, he published an article, describing Yudkin’s evidence as "flimsy indeed".
"Yudkin always maintained his equanimity, but Keys was a real a––-, who stooped to name-calling and character assassination," says Lustig, speaking from New York, where he’s just recorded yet another television interview.
The British Sugar Bureau put out a press release dismissing Yudkin’s claims as "emotional assertions" and the World Sugar Research Organisation described his book as "science fiction". When Yudkin sued, it printed a mealy-mouthed retraction, concluding: "Professor Yudkin recognises that we do not agree with [his] views and accepts that we are entitled to express our disagreement."
Yudkin was "uninvited" to international conferences. Others he organised were cancelled at the last minute, after pressure from sponsors, including, on one occasion, Coca-Cola. When he did contribute, papers he gave attacking sugar were omitted from publications. The British Nutrition Foundation, one of whose sponsors was Tate & Lyle, never invited anyone from Yudkin’s internationally acclaimed department to sit on its committees. Even Queen Elizabeth College reneged on a promise to allow the professor to use its research facilities when he retired in 1970 (to write Pure, White and Deadly). Only after a letter from Yudkin’s solicitor was he offered a small room in a separate building.
"Can you wonder that one sometimes becomes quite despondent about whether it is worthwhile trying to do scientific research in matters of health?" he wrote. "The results may be of great importance in helping people to avoid disease, but you then find they are being misled by propaganda designed to support commercial interests in a way you thought only existed in bad B films."
And this "propaganda" didn’t just affect Yudkin. By the end of the Seventies, he had been so discredited that few scientists dared publish anything negative about sugar for fear of being similarly attacked. As a result, the low-fat industry, with its products laden with sugar, boomed.
Yudkin’s detractors had one trump card: his evidence often relied on observations, rather than on explanations, of rising obesity, heart disease and diabetes rates. "He could tell you these things were happening but not why, or at least not in a scientifically acceptable way," says David Gillespie, author of the bestselling Sweet Poison. "Three or four of the hormones that would explain his theories had not been discovered."
"Yudkin knew a lot more data was needed to support his theories, but what’s important about his book is its historical significance," says Lustig. "It helps us understand how a concept can be bastardised by dark forces of industry."
From the Eighties onwards, several discoveries gave new credence to Yudkin’s theories. Researchers found fructose, one of the two main carbohydrates in refined sugar, is primarily metabolised by the liver; while glucose (found in starchy food like bread and potatoes) is metabolised by all cells. This means consuming excessive fructose puts extra strain on the liver, which then converts fructose to fat. This induces a condition known as insulin resistance, or metabolic syndrome, which doctors now generally acknowledge to be the major risk factor for heart disease, diabetes and obesity, as well as a possible factor for many cancers. Yudkin’s son, Michael, a former professor of biochemistry at Oxford, says his father was never bitter about the way he was treated, but, "he was hurt personally".
"More than that," says Michael, "he was such an enthusiast of public health, it saddened him to see damage being done to us all, because of vested interests in the food industry."
One of the problems with the anti-sugar message - then and now - is how depressing it is. The substance is so much part of our culture, that to be told buying children an ice cream may be tantamount to poisoning them, is most unwelcome. But Yudkin, who grew up in dire poverty in east London and went on to win a scholarship to Cambridge, was no killjoy. "He didn’t ban sugar from his house, and certainly didn’t deprive his grandchildren of ice cream or cake," recalls his granddaughter, Ruth, a psychotherapist. "He was hugely fun-loving and would never have wanted to be deprived of a pleasure, partly, perhaps, because he grew up in poverty and had worked so hard to escape that level of deprivation."
"My father certainly wasn’t fanatical," adds Michael. "If he was invited to tea and offered cake, he’d accept it. But at home, it’s easy to say no to sugar in your tea. He believed if you educated the public to avoid sugar, they’d understand that."
Thanks to Lustig and the rehabilitation of Yudkin’s reputation, Penguin republished Pure, White and Deadly 18 months ago. Obesity rates in the UK are now 10 times what they were when it was first published and the amount of sugar we eat has increased 31.5 per cent since 1990 (thanks to all the "invisible" sugar in everything from processed food and orange juice to coleslaw and yogurt). The number of diabetics in the world has nearly trebled. The numbers dying of heart disease has decreased, thanks to improved drugs, but the number living with the disease is growing steadily.
Related: Why are we fatter than ever?
As a result, the World Health Organisation is set to recommend a cut in the amount of sugar in our diets from 22 teaspoons per day to almost half that. But its director-general, Margaret Chan, has warned that, while it might be on the back foot at last, the sugar industry remains a formidable adversary, determined to safeguard its market position.
Recently, UK food campaigners have complained that they’re being shunned by ministers who are more than willing to take meetings with representatives from the food industry. "It is not just Big Tobacco any more," Chan said last year. "Public health must also contend with Big Food, Big Soda and Big Alcohol. All of these industries fear regulation and protect themselves by using the same tactics. They include front groups, lobbies, promises of self-regulation, lawsuits and industry-funded research that confuses the evidence and keeps the public in doubt."
Dr Julian Cooper, head of research at AB Sugar, insists the increase in the incidence of obesity in Britain is a result of, "a range of complex factors". "Reviews of the body of scientific evidence by expert committees have concluded that consuming sugar as part of a balanced diet does not induce lifestyle diseases such as diabetes and heart disease," he says.
If you look up Robert Lustig on Wikipedia, nearly two-thirds of the studies cited there to repudiate Lustig’s views were funded by Coca-Cola. But Gillespie believes the message is getting through. "More people are avoiding sugar, and when this happens companies adjust what they’re selling," he says. It’s just a shame, he adds, that a warning that could have been taken on board 40 years ago went unheeded: "Science took a disastrous detour in ignoring Yudkin. It was to the detriment of the health of millions."
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