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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51311

  • Melinda
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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51318

  • Sandi
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Yes, I've been saying this for a while now. We had a thread going a few months ago about this. I have never taken calcium; I take Magnesium, K2 and Vitamin D. That is the combination that is supposed to protect bones.

I don't know if it's doing any good. I have osteopenia, but my GP said she's surprised that it isn't much worse given the steroids I've been on since 1997.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51319

  • Sandi
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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51320

  • Sandi
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Articles posted in old thread. I only posted the links, so they probably weren't read.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the effects of personal calcium supplement use on cardiovascular risk in the Women's Health Initiative Calcium/Vitamin D Supplementation Study (WHI CaD Study), using the WHI dataset, and to update the recent meta-analysis of calcium supplements and cardiovascular risk.
DESIGN:

Reanalysis of WHI CaD Study limited access dataset and incorporation in meta-analysis with eight other studies. Data source WHI CaD Study, a seven year, randomised, placebo controlled trial of calcium and vitamin D (1g calcium and 400 IU vitamin D daily) in 36,282 community dwelling postmenopausal women. Main outcome measures Incidence of four cardiovascular events and their combinations (myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation, death from coronary heart disease, and stroke) assessed with patient-level data and trial-level data.
RESULTS:

In the WHI CaD Study there was an interaction between personal use of calcium supplements and allocated calcium and vitamin D for cardiovascular events. In the 16,718 women (46%) who were not taking personal calcium supplements at randomisation the hazard ratios for cardiovascular events with calcium and vitamin D ranged from 1.13 to 1.22 (P = 0.05 for clinical myocardial infarction or stroke, P = 0.04 for clinical myocardial infarction or revascularisation), whereas in the women taking personal calcium supplements cardiovascular risk did not alter with allocation to calcium and vitamin D. In meta-analyses of three placebo controlled trials, calcium and vitamin D increased the risk of myocardial infarction (relative risk 1.21 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.44), P = 0.04), stroke (1.20 (1.00 to 1.43), P = 0.05), and the composite of myocardial infarction or stroke (1.16 (1.02 to 1.32), P = 0.02). In meta-analyses of placebo controlled trials of calcium or calcium and vitamin D, complete trial-level data were available for 28,072 participants from eight trials of calcium supplements and the WHI CaD participants not taking personal calcium supplements. In total 1384 individuals had an incident myocardial infarction or stroke. Calcium or calcium and vitamin D increased the risk of myocardial infarction (relative risk 1.24 (1.07 to 1.45), P = 0.004) and the composite of myocardial infarction or stroke (1.15 (1.03 to 1.27), P = 0.009).
CONCLUSIONS:

Calcium supplements with or without vitamin D modestly increase the risk of cardiovascular events, especially myocardial infarction, a finding obscured in the WHI CaD Study by the widespread use of personal calcium supplements. A reassessment of the role of calcium supplements in osteoporosis management is warranted.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51321

  • Sandi
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For years, the medical establishment has recommended that aging folks supplement with calcium to maintain strong bones and avoid developing osteoporosis. And more recently, science has revealed vitamin D as a necessary nutrient co-factor in the proper absorption of calcium. But millions of people are still grossly deficient in magnesium, an important mineral compound that Dr. Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D., says is absolutely vital for maintaining proper bone health.

In a piece published earlier this year by The Huffington Post, Dr. Dean explains why a lack of magnesium, rather than a lack of calcium, is often the true culprit in age-related bone loss and other chronic health problems. So little is said about the importance of magnesium by the mainstream media, in fact, that most people have no idea that they are probably not taking in enough magnesium on a daily basis to stay healthy.

According to Dr. Dean, magnesium is one of the most important minerals for the human body, as more than 325 different enzyme systems depend on it in order to function properly. As it turns out, magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body overall, and roughly half of this total body magnesium resides in human bones. This means that elemental magnesium is just as important as calcium when it comes to bone health, if not more important.

In order for calcium to properly assimilate into the human bone structure, a proper balance of both vitamin D and magnesium is essential. If either one of these critical calcium co-factors is lacking or altogether missing, calcium alone can actually lead to long-term health problems, including the eventual calcification of the kidneys, artery walls, gall bladder, muscles, breasts and various other soft tissues throughout the body, which in turn results in chronic disease.

"Most people think that calcium is the most important factor in bone health," writes Dr. Dean. "Some are now realizing that vitamin D is also a necessary component. However, it's not well known that magnesium is necessary to convert vitamin D into its active form so that it can turn on calcium absorption."

Too much vitamin D with not enough magnesium can create more magnesium deficiency
On the same token, taking too much vitamin D apart from magnesium can also cause problems. According to extensive research conducted by Dr. Dean, the enzymes that metabolize the vitamin D hormone in your body also require magnesium in order to perform this important function. Without enough magnesium, vitamin D, especially when taken in high doses, can actually rob your body of any remaining magnesium and cause even worse deficiency.

"When you take high doses of vitamin D and if you are already low in magnesium, the increased amount of metabolic work drains magnesium from its muscle storage sites," adds Dr. Dean. "That's probably why muscles are the first to suffer magnesium deficiency symptoms -- twitching, leg cramps, restless legs and charlie horses. Angina and even heart attacks affecting the heart muscle are all magnesium deficiency symptoms."

Dr. Dean suggests taking 600 milligrams (mg) daily of elemental magnesium -- leafy greens, nuts, seeds and bananas are excellent food-based sources of magnesium -- in conjunction with between 1,000-2,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D3. If your daily vitamin D intake from supplements and/or natural sunlight is higher, you may wish to take in even higher levels of magnesium to achieve a healthy balance.

"What I do for my mineral balance is exercise daily; eat lots of vegetables, nuts and seeds; (and) take a magnesium supplement," concludes Dr. Dean. "And for my other important minerals, I take an eighth of a teaspoon of sea salt in each pint of water that I drink."

Learn more: www.naturalnews.com/042007_magnesium_bone_health_Dr_Carolyn_Dean.html#ixzz3nLjakq9X

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51322

  • Sandi
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Over the past decade I've done hundreds of interviews and articles on the dozens of benefits of magnesium. In fact, magnesium can do so much that it makes people skeptical that one simple mineral can be crucial for so many activities in the body. After all, magnesium is necessary in over 325 enzyme systems in the body that control thousands of chemical interactions.

We know that magnesium is necessary for bone health but it has a much broader scope than even I imagined. Most people think that calcium is the most important factor in bone health. Some are now realizing that vitamin D is also a necessary component. However, it's not well known that magnesium is necessary to convert vitamin D into its active form so that it can turn on calcium absorption.[1]

I became aware of the close association between vitamin D and magnesium after receiving emails from people experiencing magnesium deficiency symptoms after they began taking high doses of Vitamin D. Some doctors are prescribing 50,000iu of Vitamin D in the synthetic D2 form instead of the previous standard of 400iu per day.

It turns out that all the enzymes metabolizing vitamin D require magnesium as a necessary co-factor.[2],[3] When you take high doses of Vitamin D and if you are already low in magnesium, the increased amount of metabolic work drains magnesium from its muscle storage sites. That's probably why muscles are the first to suffer magnesium deficiency symptoms -- twitching, leg cramps, restless legs and charlie horses. Angina and even heart attacks affecting the heart muscle are all magnesium deficiency symptoms.

A reader of my blog reported that her vitamin D levels remained chronically low (below 30) despite months of high-dose supplementation of vitamin D. It wasn't until she added magnesium that things changed quite dramatically. After adding magnesium, her last vitamin D level was 67, which for her was a miracle. This turn about surprised her endocrinologist as well. She also noticed a big difference in how she felt. She no longer had chronic "unexplained" muscle tenderness, and could exercise longer on her treadmill and felt great.

Personally, I think we should consider that part of the vitamin D deficiency epidemic is an underlying magnesium deficiency. That could mean that we don't really need extraordinarily high doses of vitamin D, but a combination of vitamin D along with magnesium to make the vitamin D work. I often recommend 1,000-2,000iu along with 600 mg of elemental magnesium.

What about calcium? Magnesium stimulates the hormone calcitonin, which helps to preserve bone structure by drawing calcium out of the blood and soft tissues back into the bones. This action helps lower the likelihood of osteoporosis, some forms of arthritis, heart attack and kidney stones.[2] So, if you're taking lots of calcium and not much magnesium, you are susceptible to these conditions.

Almost half the population of the U.S. (almost 70 percent of adult women) uses dietary supplements containing calcium.[4] In general, we absorb less than half of the calcium we ingest. Some researchers warn that calcium supplements are responsible for an increase in calcification. Calcium causes constipation and builds up in the body in soft tissues where it can harden (calcify). The sites of calcification include artery walls, kidneys, gall bladder, muscles and breast tissue.

Recommendations for calcium intake vary greatly. In the U.S., adults are advised to take 1,200 mg per day of supplemental calcium over an above their intake through food and water. And women over 50 are told to take up to 1,500 mg. In the United Kingdom, the RDA is 700 mg daily, while the World Health Organization recommends only 400-500 mg. Adding to our calcium load are many foods that are fortified with calcium, including orange juice, sports drinks and breakfast cereals.

In 2011, a British Medical Journal meta-analysis sounded the alarm that "Risks outweigh benefits for calcium supplements."[5] The study indicates that calcium supplements do more harm than good. They cause more cardiovascular events (such as heart attacks and stroke) than the number of fractures they prevent.

The seven authors of the study expressed concern that with so many people taking calcium supplements, "Even a small increase in incidence of cardiovascular disease could translate into a large burden of disease in the population." They even go so far as to "suggest that a reassessment of the role of calcium supplements in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis is warranted."

That's a huge admission of failure of the main treatment for osteoporosis -- high-dose calcium supplementation. In fact, researchers in a study of postmenopausal women with high milk intake speculate that high levels of calcium may actually be a cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic bone fractures.[6] The researchers fail to realize that it's not just the high doses of calcium but the lack of magnesium that's the underlying problem. So they can't just say calcium is bad for bones; calcium is required for bones, but so is magnesium.

The effectiveness and benefits of calcium in preventing and treating osteoporosis are enormously impaired in the absence of adequate levels of magnesium. Magnesium keeps calcium dissolved in the blood. Too much calcium along with too little magnesium can cause some forms of arthritis, kidney stones, osteoporosis and calcification of the arteries, leading to heart attack and cardiovascular disease.[4] So, it's not just the calcium causing these problems but an associated lack of magnesium.

Why have we become a nation of calcium pill poppers? Because it's the agreed-upon solution to osteoporosis and the mantra of the dairy industry that "Everybody needs milk."

Even the commonly agreed-upon ratio of 2:1 calcium to magnesium found in many supplements is a major stumbling block overcoming the overcalcification of our population.

In fact, it's a myth. This so-called recommendation traces back to French scientist Jean Durlach who warned that the 2:1 ratio was a "never to be exceeded" level when considering calcium intake from all sources (food, water and supplements).[7] His warning has been greatly misunderstood and is taken as a recommendation of a 2:1 calcium-to-magnesium imbalance instead of something to avoid.

The fact that most people do not get their minimum daily requirement of magnesium exacerbates the situation. A hundred years ago we enjoyed a diet high in magnesium with a daily intake of 500 mg. Today we are lucky to get 200 mg.[8] However, calcium in the diet has never been higher. This high-calcium, low-magnesium diet, when coupled with calcium supplementation, can give a calcium to magnesium imbalance of 10:1 or even higher -- which constitutes a walking time bomb of impaired bone health and heart disease.

What I do for my mineral balance is exercise daily; eat lots of vegetables, nuts and seeds; take a magnesium supplement. And for my other important minerals, I take an eighth of a teaspoon of sea salt in each pint of water that I drink.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51323

  • Sandi
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Considering the fact that the bone is the site of storage for half of the magnesium in the body, the mineral must be essential to the mineralization of the bone. And it is.
Magnesium as Bone Mineral

Even though calcium is widely believed to be the sole mineral content of the bone, the truth is there are at least a dozen minerals that make up the bone. One of these other minerals is magnesium.

The 50% of the body’s magnesium level stored in the bone makes up 1% of the mineral content of the bone.

You may think that 1% is a small fraction of the bone but the function of magnesium in the bone makes it more important to bone strength than bone mineral content. The chief influence of magnesium involves the nature of the bone matrix and also bone metabolism.

When magnesium is increasingly stripped away from the bone, bone crystals become larger, hollower and more brittle.

Studies have shown that women with osteoporosis usually have large bone crystals than women who do not have osteoporosis. Scientists believe that this is responsible for the increased brittleness of the bones of osteoporotic women.

Therefore, magnesium affects the microstructure of the bones and it is needed to prevent the deterioration of bone tissue. With low magnesium levels, the bone becomes fragile and the risk of fractures is significantly higher.
Magnesium as Calcium Regulator

Magnesium is involved in the absorption and metabolism of calcium. This is why low magnesium level causes hypocalcemia.

Magnesium raises blood calcium levels by improving its absorption. This is why most calcium supplements also contain magnesium. However, most supplements contain calcium in twice the amount of magnesium. Studies have shown that this may not the ideal ratio especially for bone health.

High blood calcium level can actually prevent the absorption of magnesium. Multiple clinical studies have confirmed that high blood calcium level is actually bad for the health.

When calcium accumulates in the blood, it is readily deposited on the soft tissues of the body as well as the walls of arteries. This causes calcification of tissues and organs and is also responsible for the increased risk of heart attack, stroke and kidney stones associated with high-dose calcium supplementation.

Ideally, your magnesium intake should rival or even be higher than your calcium intake.

Magnesium does not only increase blood calcium levels but also regulates its effect and helps move it to the bones where calcium is needed.

This is not only good for bone health and cardiovascular health but it has also been demonstrated to help reduce the risk of kidney stones by preventing the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys.

Because the body only absorbs half of the calcium it gets from dietary sources and studies have shown that calcium-only supplementation is ineffective in the treatment of osteoporosis and bad for health, magnesium becomes a lot more important than calcium for improving bone mineral density and bone strength.
Magnesium as Hormone Sensitizer

One of the ways by which magnesium deficiency impairs calcium metabolism is by inhibiting the activity of the hormones that regulate calcium. These hormones include calcitriol (Vitamin D), parathyroid hormone and calcitonin.

Magnesium can make the body more sensitive to the effects of vitamin D. One of such effects of the vitamin is the utilization of calcium by the bones.

Vitamin D (along with vitamin K) is needed for proper mineralization of the body. Together, these vitamins stimulate the production of the protein, osteocalcin, from osteoblasts (the cells that produce the bone). Osteocalcin then binds calcium to the bone.

Therefore, vitamin D should be combined with calcium to improve bone health. And magnesium makes this combination work.

In addition, calcitonin is also essential to the mineralization of the bone. This thyroid hormone removes calcium from the blood and soft tissues and returns the mineral back to the bone.

Magnesium enhances the activities of calcitonin and stimulates its release from the thyroid gland.

Lastly, magnesium is also involved in the secretion of parathyroid hormone. Studies show that low magnesium levels triggers the release of this hormone. However, very low magnesium level (such as the one seen during magnesium deficiency) paradoxically blocks the secretion of parathyroid hormone.

Although parathyroid hormone raises blood calcium levels by removing the mineral from bones (the opposite effect to calcitonin), it is also known to promote vitamin D production and regulate magnesium levels.

Is parathyroid hormone good or bad for bone health? All evidence points to the former.

Reduced sensitivity to parathyroid hormone is one of the presentations of osteoporosis. And studies show that magnesium improves parathyroid hormone activity, increases bone turnover and produces an overall increase in bone mass.
Magnesium as Alkalizing Agent

Magnesium is an alkalizing agent in the body. It can help restore the pH of the blood by neutralizing acidity.

In fact, magnesium-rich foods are commonly used in detoxification programs to help counter the harmful effects of acidifying foods and drugs.

The alkalizing effect of magnesium can also help bone mineral density by preventing the leaching away of calcium from the bones. When the acidity of the blood is raised, the body strips calcium from bones to help neutralize this acidity. Therefore, calcium removes the acidifying agent out of the body but this can easily lead to bone loss as the calcium used is also excreted.

Because magnesium is also an alkalizing agent, it can be sacrificed in place of calcium.

Therefore, by restoring the acid-base balance before the body turns to calcium, magnesium protects the bone and helps maintain bone mass.

A 1999 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition confirmed this effect.

In that study, the researchers took data from the famed Framingham Heart Study to correlate dietary magnesium (as well as potassium, fruits and vegetables) intake with bone mineral densities of the participants.

The researchers concluded that alkalizing agents such as magnesium (and potassium, fruits and vegetables) contributed to the maintenance of bone mineral density.
More Studies on Magnesium and Bone Health
Magnesium Deficiency and Osteoporosis

A 1999 study published in the journal, Magnesium Research, investigated the mechanisms by which magnesium deficiency affects bone health in rats.

The researchers induced magnesium deficiency in a group of rats while keeping another group on magnesium-rich diet. They measured the serum levels of magnesium, calcium, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D at regular intervals during the 16-week duration of the study.

The mineral contents of the rat’s femurs were assessed early in the study and at the end.

The results showed that at the end of the 16-week, the rats fed on magnesium-depleted diet had very low serum magnesium, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D levels but higher calcium levels than the control group.

In addition, the researchers found that magnesium deficiency disrupted the cycle of bone formation and bone resorption and, therefore, resulted in reduced bone volume and loss of bone mass.

A 2006 study published in the journal, Osteoporosis International, also investigated the effect of magnesium on bone health and found that bone mass was affected by low magnesium levels even before the animals became magnesium deficient.

The researchers found that lowering magnesium intake to 50% of the recommended dietary intake can significantly lower bone mineral content and reduce bone volume.

They attributed these changes to lowered vitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels as well as the increased production of inflammatory cytokines and substance P.

A 2009 study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition also reached the same conclusions.

The researchers found that these negative effects on the bone suggested that the rising incidence of osteoporosis may be due to long-term suboptimal magnesium intake. Therefore, although clear magnesium deficiency is rare, the risk of osteoporosis is still high in the population because most people never get the recommended daily dietary intake of magnesium.
Magnesium, Alcoholism and Osteoporosis

A 1994 study published in the journal, Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, investigated the possibility of magnesium deficiency induced by alcoholism being responsible for the increased risk of osteoporosis among alcoholics.

The researchers identified that chronic alcoholism can contribute to magnesium deficiency by

reducing kidney functions and causing magnesium loss through impaired reabsorption of the mineral from the kidney tubules
low dietary magnesium intake through poor dietary choices
gastrointestinal loss of magnesium through vomiting and diarrhea
use of prescription drugs (aminoglycosides and diuretics) that remove magnesium from the body

All of these effects of alcoholism can reduce bone mass by causing chronic hypomagnesemia or clear magnesium deficiency.

Alcoholic osteoporosis is, however, not the only form of osteoporosis associated with low serum and bone magnesium levels.

A 1988 study published in the journal, Magnesium Research, also found large, abnormal bone crystals and low bone magnesium levels in people suffering from postmenopausal osteoporosis and osteoporosis in the elderly.
Magnesium and Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

The use of magnesium supplements in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is well studied.

One example of such studies was published in the journal, Nutrition Reviews, in 1995. At the end of the 2-year study, the researchers concluded that magnesium supplementation was effective at increasing bone mineral density and preventing fractures.

A 1991 study published in the Journal of Nutritional Medicine also came to this conclusion.

For this study, the researchers investigated the benefits of magnesium-rich diet given to postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement treatment for 6 – 12 months.

They found that magnesium not only increased bone mineral density and reduced fractures but that these positive effects persisted for 2 years after the magnesium intervention. The researchers, therefore, recommended the adoption of magnesium-rich diet by women as early as the start of menopause in order to help prevent osteoporotic fractures.

A 1990 study published in the journal, Magnesium Research, identified an oversight in the hormone replacement treatment recommended for postmenopausal women.

The researchers discovered that the estrogen and calcium prescribed for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis increased the body’s need for magnesium. Therefore, long-term use of both agents can lower magnesium levels and even cause magnesium deficiency.

Such outcome will defeat the purpose of calcium-estrogen therapy for improving bone health because magnesium is needed to move calcium from the blood to the bones.

The researchers also recognized the dangers of increasing the dose of calcium supplement without also raising the dose of magnesium. In their recommendation, they considered magnesium supplementation to be especially vital to a safe and effective calcium-estrogen combination therapy in postmenopausal osteoporosis treatment.

Lastly, a 1990 study published in The Journal of Reproductive Medicine reviewed past studies investigating calcium megadose supplementation in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

The researchers found high-dose calcium to be ineffective for reducing the risk of osteoporotic fractures and also dangerous because it caused soft tissue calcification.

In their opinion, they believed magnesium to be the more important mineral for improving bone mass and reducing the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 2 months ago #51327

  • Winnifred
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Every time there is study that shows something is good. People jump on the wagon and start doing it. The more people who do the more chances of side effects. This is why you find years after something is said to be good that it really isn't as good for you as they thought. If 10 studies say it is good and 1 new study says it is bad who do you believe? Is the new study just the begining will there be more?? probably.


Like any medication they have good and bad side effects. What we need to decide as individuals is the risk worth the benefits?

1. If you come from a long line of family where things like clogged arteries, heart attacks, and strokes run in your family than I would say buyer beware.

2. If your a women and osteoporosis runs in your family you may just think differently and want to take the risk.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51333

  • Melinda
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I need to print all that Sandi so I can read it properly. Thanks.

Julia regarding women and osteoporosis - men too!! My father in law had it and it was horrendous - not diagnosed for ages though because of his gender.

I was told calcium since I broke my foot - but the break had nothing to do with not enough calcium or my age, there was a rock hidden under leaves and I stepped on it rolling my foot and that caused the break. So I think I'll stop the supplement.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51335

  • mrsb04
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Fascinating reads thank you Sandi. I was put on Calcium and Vit D when my osteoporosis was diagnosed last year as my levels of both were low. In fact getting them both rechecked in about an hour. I eat plenty of magnesium rich foods so hopefully have a good balance now. Am seeing ITP consultant a week on Monday. She will give me a form for bloods the next week so will ask her to add magnesium levels to test.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51340

  • Sandi
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Melinda - I know, information overload! The articles are interesting though.

Mrs. B - I've done a lot of reading about Magnesium and apparently, blood tests do not show if a person has a deficiency. By the time it shows up in labs, a deficiency is already there and can take months to correct. There are 9 different types of Magnesium that all do different things. Oxide is the worst and the most commonly sold in drug stores. It is not absorbed well and can cause loose stools. I take Magnesium Glycinate and Magnesium Malate, both are absorbable and relax muscles. It really does work (for me). It pays to research it; there is a lot of information out there.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51342

  • Aoi
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These are excellent points. Bone health has little to do with calcium intake and much more to do with other micronutrients. Also very important is protein intake. Long-term protein insufficiency may be a contributing factor to osteopenia and osteoporosis. Of course, exercise is also important for long-term bone health.

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51466

  • Melinda
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Sandi I have looked at a few brands of magnesium and all were oxide except one was soy something. Will make a trip to Natural Grocers and see what they have.

The Magnesium Glycinate and Magnesium Malate are different products right?

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51468

  • Sandi
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  • Sandi Forum Moderator Diagnosed in 1998, currently in remission. Diagnosed with Lupus in 2006. Last Count - 344k - 6-9-18
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I got my Magnesium from Amazon. Malate and Glycinate are good for muscles which is why I got those two. The stores usually do only carry Oxide. GNC does carry a Super Magnesium which is Aspartate, Lactate and Citrate - three more different types of Magnesium. It can be confusing.

www.ancient-minerals.com/magnesium-supplements/

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OT - Calcium supplements & people over 50 7 years 1 month ago #51469

  • Sandi
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Somewhere on the Forum I was talking about the bladder pressure that I have and self-diagnosed Interstitial cystitis. It wakes me up in the middle of the night and I can't get back to sleep. I read that Magnesium helps, especially the ones that relax muscles because the problem is an inflamed, overactive bladder. I mentioned the bladder pressure to my Rheumatologist last week and she said, "Oh, that sounds like Interstitial cystitis". I said yes, I knew that and that I had been taking Magnesium. She said that was the best thing to use. It also helps myalgia. I swear by Magnesium. It helps with a lot of problems if you get the right one.

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