Platelet E-News – February 13, 2009

This e-newsletter is a monthly publication of the Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

ITP Research and Treatments

Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

General Health and Medicine

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General Health and Medicine

SEVERE BLEEDING IS RARE IN CHILDREN WITH ITP

Severe bleeding is uncommon at diagnosis in children with ITP, and is rare in the next 4 weeks, regardless of the type of treatment received, according to a review of 863 patients in the Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group. The authors suggest examination of other outcomes in future therapeutic trials, such as adverse effects of drug treatment, health-related quality of life, and treatment cost. An accompanying editorial suggests that although most clinicians use a platelet count of less than or equal to 20,000 to institute treatment, regardless of severity of bleeding, the platelet count is not a good surrogate for treatment. He suggests clinicians treat based on clinical bleeding severity, rather than platelet counts, to avoid costly and sometimes toxic treatment for patients who have only mild to moderate bleeding.

Neunert CE, Buchanan GR, Imbach P, et. al. Severe hemorrhage in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Blood. November 15, 2008, 112(10): 4003-4008.

Abshire T. Childhood ITP: can we venture below 20,000? Blood. November 15, 2008, 112(10): 3918-3919.

PLATELETS IS EXCELLENT RESOURCE

Platelets (Academic Press, 2002, 1000 pages) is “an attractive and essentially comprehensive compendium that is one of the first to appear on this important subject in more than a decade,” according to a 2003 review of the book. The award-winning book contains 61 chapters by 108 experts, and contains descriptions on platelet disorders, including ITP.

Nichols WL. Platelets. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis,1:1860-1861.

STEROIDS INEFFECTIVE FOR WHEEZING PRESCHOOLERS

A short course of oral prednisolone is widely used for preschool children taken to the hospital with wheezing. But a randomized, double-blind trial comparing a 5-day course of oral prednisolone to placebo in 700 children (ages 10 months to 5 years) in 3 U.K. hospitals showed no difference in duration of hospital stay—or in any secondary outcomes—between the two groups.

Panickar J, Lakhanpaul M, Lambert PC, Kenia P, Stephenson T, Smyth A, Grigg J. Oral prednisolone for preschool children with acute virus-induced wheezing. The New England Journal of Medicine. 360(4):329-338.

NEW FINDINGS EXPLAIN HOW IVIG SUPPRESSES IMMUNE SYSTEM

One mechanism for the immunosuppressive activity of IgG, including IVIG, may be through the activity of regulatory T cells. The authors found that regulatory T-cell epitopes (Tregitopes) on IgG activate a subset of natural T regs that tip the resulting immune response toward tolerance rather than immunogenicity (property that enables a substance to provoke an immune response). An editorial in the same journal notes that these findings, that Tregitopes on IgG activate and expand Tregs, helps explain how IVIg promotes tolerance in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

DeGroot AS, Moise L, McMurry JA, et. al. Activation of natural regulatory T cells by IgG Fc-derived peptide “Tregitopes.” Blood. October 15, 2008, 112(8):3303-3311. Caspi RR. Tregitopes switch on Tregs. Blood. October 15, 2008, 112(8): 3003-3004.

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Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

UNFAVORABLE DRUG TRIALS OFTEN GO UNPUBLISHED

Information on new drugs is often incomplete and biased, according to a study by UC San Francisco researchers, who found that nearly a quarter of drug trials submitted to the FDA are never published in a medical journal. They reviewed reports of 164 trials of 33 new drugs approved by the FDA from 2001 to 2002. By June 2007, 22 percent of the trials were published only in partial form or were not published at all. The unpublished trials were mainly those with unfavorable results.

Ehrenberg R. Many drug trials never published. Science News. December 20, 2008, pg. 14.

WEB SITE DISCLOSES INDUSTRY TIES TO PHYSICIANS

On its Web site, Cleveland Clinic has begun disclosing industry ties of its physicians and researchers and their immediate families. Duke Clinical Research Institute has made a similar move, and others have made promises to do the same. The online disclosures are a response to concerns about financial conflicts of interest. A NEJM Perspective suggests that the disclosures could go further.

Steinbrook R. Online disclosure of physician-industry relationships. The New England Journal of Medicine. January 22, 2009; 360(4): 325-327.

ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT BUGS ARE MAJOR CHALLENGE OF 21ST CENTURY

Several bacteria have adapted and evolved resistance to existing antibiotics so that they pose serious clinical challenges to humans. In a Perspective article, researchers from University of Texas Medical School in Houston describe the challenges in treating infections from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus faecium and nosocomial gram-negative bacteria. Their emergence outside of hospitals and weak pipeline of new antibiotics is worrisome.

Arias CA, Murray BE. Antibiotic-resistant bugs in the 21st century – a clinical super-challenge. The New England Journal of Medicine. January 29, 2009; 360(5): 439-443.

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General Health and Medicine

PROTECT YOUR HEALTH IN TIMES OF FINANCIAL STRESS

Noting recent survey results that 80% of respondents say the economy is a significant cause of stress, Dr. Andrew Weil’s newsletter offers 4 steps to protect against anxiety and stress. Practice daily relaxation, make a plan to manage your budget, care for your body (eat well, exercise and get enough sleep), and try a “news fast”. In particular, don’t watch the news right before bed.

Health & The Economy. Dr. Andrew Weil’s Self Healing. January 2009. Pg. 1.

4 in 10 AMERICANS USE COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

Close to 40% of U.S. adults and 12% of children use some form of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapy, according to a survey of 23,000 adults by NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. CAM includes therapies not considered part of conventional medicine, such as natural therapies, acupuncture, deep breathing, relaxation, and energy healing therapy. The most commonly used CAM methods were natural therapies, mainly fish oil/omega 3, glucosamine, Echinacea, and flaxseed. Adults were most likely to use CAM methods for back, neck, or joint pain.

http://nccam.nih.gov/news/camstats/2007/camsurvey_fs1.htm

WARNING TO COOKS: COMMON BAKING INGREDIENT MAY CONTAIN TOXIC BLOOD THINNER

Pure vanilla is made with the extract of beans from the vanilla plant. Mexican vanilla is often made with the extract of beans from the tonka tree, which can contain coumarin, a compound related to warfarin, a blood thinner. Eating food with coumarin is risky for people taking blood-thinning drugs. Although the FDA has long banned coumarin from food products, the agency has found Mexican vanilla in ethnic food stores and Mexican restaurants in the U.S. The FDA says beware of lower-priced vanilla extracts, avoid buying vanilla in Latin American countries, and look for vanilla bean on the ingredients list. Avoid products including ‘tonka bean or with vague ingredient lists, and those not written in English.

www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/mexicanvilla102908.html

BRAIN SCANS SHOW FIBROMYALGIA IS REAL

Fibromyalgia sufferers, who are often told the ailment is a figment of their imagination, got a boost from French researchers who evaluated 20 women with fibromyalgia and 10 healthy women. In brain scans using SPECT imaging, fibromyalgia patients had functional abnormalities, and the brain changes correlated with severity of the disease. 10 million Americans are thought to have fibromyalgia, a complex chronic condition affecting mostly women that includes fatigue, problems with cognitive functioning, memory and concentration, difficulty sleeping, and stiffness.

Guedj E, Cammilleri S, Niboyet J, Dupont P, Vidal E, Dropinski J-P, Mundler O. Clinical Correlate of Brain SPECT Perfusion Abnormalities in Fibromyalgia. Journal of Nuclear Medicine. October 16, 2008, 49(11):1798-1803.

ENHANCED MUSHROOMS PACKED WITH VITAMIN D

By exposing ordinary mushrooms to ultraviolet-B light while they grow, the USDA Agricultural Research Service found it can boost the mushrooms’ vitamin D content so that a 3-ounce serving provides 100% of the recommended amount of the hard-to-get vitamin. The enhanced mushrooms, grown by Monterey Mushrooms Inc., will be marketed under the label “Sun Bella.”

http://www.ars.usda.gov/IS/pr/2008/081112.htm?pf=1

http://www.montereymushrooms.com/VitaD.htm

EXERCISE REVERSES MENTAL DECLINE AND REDUCES FALLS

Evidence for the benefit of exercise continues to grow, as noted in the new Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, released by the Department of Health and Human Services. Two and a half hours of moderate exercise each week is the goal, or 75 minutes of vigorous activity. A new study in people age 70+ found that twice-weekly walks plus strength training and balance exercises can boost performance on cognitive tests and reduces falls by 36%. The new guidelines are available: www.health/gov/paguidelines

Fitness for your brain: exercise reverses mental decline. Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter. January 2009, pg. 1-2,8.

RESEARCHERS FIND LINK BETWEEN MELATONIN AND DIABETES

Diabetes rates rise as sleep declines. But how? New studies indicate that the link is a protein that senses the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin. Melatonin, which regulates the body’s sleep clock, is closely linked to increased blood sugar levels and diabetes. People with a single change in a gene that encodes the receptor for melatonin were more likely to have high blood sugar levels, low insulin levels, and type 2 diabetes. It turns out that melatonin receptors, which are known to exist in the brain—home to the body’s master clock—are also found on the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin.

Sanders L. Gene connects lack of shut-eye with diabetes. Science News. January 3, 2009, pg. 5.

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This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, 133 Rollins Avenue, Suite 5, Rockville, MD 20852, phone 1-87-Platelet, fax: 301-770-6638, web: http://www.pdsa.org, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

To unsubscribe: send an email to: admin@pdsa.org and place ‘remove’ in the subject line. To change your e-mail address, send an e-mail with your old and new address to: admin@pdsa.org

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Platelet E-News – January 28, 2009

This e-newsletter is a monthly publication of the Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

ITP Research and Treatments

Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

General Health and Medicine

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General Health and Medicine

Boosting Platelet Production in ITP

The long-held view that ITP is mainly caused by autoantibody destruction of platelets is only part of the story, according to a review of recent clinical studies by Australian researchers. Ineffective platelet production has a clear role in ITP, as shown by the effectiveness of new thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists that stimulate platelet production. Although bone marrow megakaryocytes, which give rise to platelets, are typically plentiful in ITP, those megakaryocytes have structural abnormalities. The authors suggest that studies showing TPO receptor agonists can elevate platelet count rapidly in the majority of patients with severe ITP will stimulate new interest in how autoantibodies inhibit megakaryocyte maturation and platelet production. Long term studies are still needed to investigate concerns over side effects found in a few patients on these newer drugs.

Wei A, Jackson SP. Boosting Platelet Production. Nature Medicine, September 2008, 14(9):917-928.

New Way to Block Inflammation in Autoimmune Disease

A promising new target for autoimmune disease treatment, a cell-surface receptor called DR3, has been discovered by scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Blocking the receptor may slow or stop the damaging inflammation involved in autoimmune disease. Mice engineered to lack DR3 were resistant to two immune system diseases, asthma and multiple sclerosis. DR3 is a tumor necrosis factor. Many potent treatments for inflammatory diseases interfere with the action of TNF.

Scientists find potential new way to block inflammation in autoimmune disease. INFOCUS, newsletter of the Autoimmune Disease Association. September 2008, 16(3), pg. 7.

FDA Studying Safety of Drugs to Treat Autoimmune Disorders

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has begun a safety review of drugs that block tumor necrosis factor (TNF) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn’s disease. The FDA is investigating 30 reports of cancer development in children and young adults who took the drugs. The drugs under study are Enbrel (etanercept), Humira (adalimumab), and Remicade (infliximab).

FDA begins study of autoimmune treatment drugs. INFOCUS, newsletter of the Autoimmune Disease Association. September 2008, 16(3), pg. 6.

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Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

Rising Medical Costs Driving More Americans Into Debt

More Americans—those with and without health insurance—are struggling to pay medical bills in this deepening recession. 79 million Americans under age 65 (up from 58 million in 2005) were paying off medical debt or had problems paying medical bills in 2007, according to a study by the Commonwealth Fund. A Washington Post article offers tips for managing medical debt: Billing errors are common, so carefully review all bills; make sure you’ve exhausted all payment sources, including current and former employers and see if you’re eligible for charity care; request a discount – Medicare or Medicaid prices may be 50% lower than the price uninsured patients are charged; try not to use your credit card and do not mortgage your house to pay medical bills; and never ignore medical bills, it can make matters worse.

Boodman, SG. Seeing Red. The Washington Post, January 13, 2009, Pg. F1, F5.

National Human Genome Research Institute Wants Your Input

The NHGRI, part of NIH, is asking for community input on three white papers as part of its long-term planning process for the future of human genome research, specifically on

1) diagnostics, preventive medicine, and pharmacogenomics;

2) therapeutics; and

3) education and community engagement. Comments will be posted anonymously on the Web site.

www.genome.gov/About/Planning

Sign Up to Receive Drug Warnings Via Email

For a more thorough view of medication warnings than may be available on the FDA’s Web site, check out the Web site of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Once there, you can sign up to receive email alerts related to specific prescription drug products.

www.consumermedsafety.org.

Web Site Offers Patients and Loved Ones A Way to Stay Connected

How to update dozens of family and friends on your medical condition, or connect with others who can offer encouragement? The nonprofit CaringBridge offers free, personalized Web sites so people can post updates and receive comments during a health crisis, treatment, and recovery. Users just need an email address and Internet access.

www.CaringBridge.org.

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General Health and Medicine

Common Cold Remedy Can Cause Respiratory Distress in Children

Vicks VapoRub should not be used for children under age 2 and should not be applied directly under the nose, according to a study by researchers at Wake Forest University. The common remedy for chest congestion can act as an irritant, causing the body to produce more mucus to protect the airway; in infants with narrow airways, swelling and extra mucus can be dangerous.

Abanses JC, Arima S, Rubin BK. Vicks VapoRub Induces Mucin Secretion, Decreases Ciliary Beat Frequency, and Increases Tracheal Mucus Transport in the Ferret Trachea. Chest, January 2009, 135(1), pg. 143-148.

Foods To Support a Healthy Immune System

Citrus fruit is packed with immune-boosting nutrients, as are orange vegetables (sweet potatoes and carrots) shitake mushrooms, and lean beef in moderation. Yogurt with active probiotic cultures balances the immune system in the digestive tract. Black and green tea contain antioxidants and the spice turmeric helps fight cold and flu (but don’t overdue green tea or turmeric if you have ITP; these act as natural blood thinners).

Feed Your Immune System. Washington Jewish Week, January 8, 2009.

Wisdom Teeth Contain Stem Cells That Can Grow New Teeth

If you haven’t had your wisdom teeth pulled yet, don’t. Turns out they are a great source of the adult stem cells that could be used one day to regrow your teeth, if the need arises. Although fewer Americans lose adult teeth than in past generations, scientists at NIH are devising a way to use adult stem cells to create living roots and eventually grow a full tooth.

Garreau J. A Moment of Tooth. The Washington Post, January 5, 2009, Pg C1,C8.

Time Spent With the Younger Generation Extends Life—At Least for Flies

Fruit flies with a genetic mutation that reduces lifespan survived twice as long as expected when they were housed with young flies.

Strange Science. Nature Medicine, September 2008, 14(9):1305.

Patients Believe You Get What You Pay For

Patients are more likely to feel a positive effect from a medication with a high price tag, according to a study by researchers at MIT. Two groups were given placebo pills, one group was told the pills cost $2.50 each; the others were told each pill was discounted to $0.10 each. Of those taking the pricier pill, 85% said they felt less pain; of those who took the cheaper version, 61% felt an effect.

Strange Science. Nature Medicine, September 2008, 14(9):1305.

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This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, 133 Rollins Avenue, Suite 5, Rockville, MD 20852, phone 1-87-Platelet, fax: 301-770-6638, web: http://www.pdsa.org, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

To unsubscribe: send an email to: admin@pdsa.org and place ‘remove’ in the subject line. To change your e-mail address, send an e-mail with your old and new address to: admin@pdsa.org

Read more...

Platelet E-News – February 22, 2010

This e-newsletter is a monthly publication of the Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

ITP Research and Treatments

Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

General Health and Medicine


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ITP Research and Treatments

 

PLATELETS CAN DIVIDE

Platelets, although they are missing a nucleus, can multiply and form new platelets after they are released from the bone marrow, according to researchers at the University of Utah who observed this new phenomenon in blood stored for distribution as well as in cultures. Outside of the body, platelets can continue to grow and divide, first forming an elongated dumbbell shape, then splitting in two. One of the next steps for the group is to study the process in flowing blood.

Schwertz H, “Anucleate platelets generate progeny,” Blood. 2010 Jan 19 (e-pub)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20086251

 

 

NOW ENROLLING – CLINICAL TRIAL FOR NEW TPO DRUG

Shionogi USA is now enrolling adults diagnosed with ITP who are 18 years or older in a randomized clinical trial of S-88871, a new, once-daily thrombopoietin (TPO) pill designed to stimulate the bone marrow to make more platelets. While Shionogi is not a well-recognized name in the US, the Japanese know it as one of their largest pharmaceutical companies.

Find details on the study sites, duration of the trial, drug dosage, and enrollment criteria at http://www.clinicaltrial.gov/ct2/show/NCT01054443 or contact Wendy Curran at (973) 966-6900 ext 128.

 

 

NEW FDA LABEL FOR WINRHO SDF® CALLS FOR LONGER POST-INFUSION OBSERVATION

The WinRho SDF® package insert now includes a stronger warning about the possibility of intravascular hemolysis (IVH), destruction of red blood cells in circulation, and recommendations for the doctor to do additional laboratory tests and increase observation time after the administration. While this side effect may occur in a very small percentage of people, it can lead to serious consequences if not caught or treated. Any signs of IVH, including back pain, shaking chills, fever, and discolored urine, should be reported to the doctor immediately.

For more information see:
http://www.pdsa.org/treatments/conventional/anti-d.html

http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/BloodBloodProducts/ApprovedProducts/LicensedProductsBLAs/FractionatedPlasmaProducts/ucm089397.htm

 

 

EISAI, INC COMPLETES ACQUISITION OF AKARX, INC.

Eisai, Inc. announced that it has completed the acquisition of AkaRx, Inc., including the rights to develop, manufacture, and market AKR-501, a drug that stimulates platelet production. AkaRx, Inc. and later MGI Pharma, Inc. have conducted a Phase II trial for the drug in ITP. Eisai will also test the compound for thrombocytopenia associated with liver disease and chemotherapy.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/eisai-completes-acquisition-of-akarx-inc-and-continues-development-of-akr-501-for-thrombocytopenia-80845092.html

 

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Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

 

TIPS TO HELP PATIENTS NEGOTIATE LOWER MEDICAL BILLS

If you’re insured, under-insured, or uninsured it is possible to negotiate a reduction in your medical bills, according to Carrie McLean, of eHealthinsurance.com. Paying cash and paying quickly are good negotiating points. Other strategies include getting a quote up front, arranging a payment plan, researching the Medicare reimbursement rate, checking for billing errors, and hiring a medical negotiator.

Gina Roberts-Grey, “Woman slashes $10,000 in medical bills by almost 30%. How you can, too.”

http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2010/02/12/woman-slashes-10-000-in-medical-bills-by-almost-30-how-you-ca/

 

General Health and Medicine

 

THYME OIL CALMS INFLAMMATION AND H-PYLORI

When researchers in Japan screened essential oils for anti-inflammatory properties they found that thyme oil reduced the Cox-2 inflammatory marker by 75%. Carvacrol, a compound in thyme oil, was the most active anti-inflammatory ingredient. In another study, thyme oil reduced Helicobacter pylori activity in a controlled setting.

(Note: both inflammation and H. pylori have been associated with ITP) Hotta M, “Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARalpha and gamma and suppresses COX-2 expression.” J Lipid Res. 2010 Jan; 51(1):132-9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19578162

Eftekhar F, “Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and essential oil composition of Thymus caramanicus from Iran.” Nat Prod Commun. 2009 Aug; 4(8):1139-42.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19769000

 

 

BPA INTERFERES WITH DIGESTION

BPA (bisphenol A), a chemical often found in plastics and the lining of metal cans can reduce the ability of intestines to absorb nutrients and can increase digestive inflammation. It had long been known that BPA behaves like a hormone and it has been linked to breast cancer, obesity, early onset of puberty, among other conditions, but this research reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is the first to examine the effect of BPA on the gut.

Braniste, et al, “Impact of oral bisphenol A at reference doses on intestinal barrier function and sex differences after perinatal exposure in rats.” PNAS January 5, 2010 vol. 107 no. 1 448-453

http://www.pnas.org/content/107/1/448.abstract?sid=3f35d631-75f7-49c3-ac3f-aa14c8966e22

http://www.physorg.com/news182959051.html

 

 

FDA AND HHS TAKE ACTION ON BPA

BPA is coming under increased scrutiny by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and its subsidiary, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Because children, especially infants, are more susceptible to the effects of BPA, HHS has published a guide for parents on their Web site. For its part, the FDA is funding additional research on the effects of BPA as well as supporting efforts to reduce its use.

 

“Bisphenol A (BPA) Information for Parents”
http://www.hhs.gov/safety/bpa/

“Bisphenol A (BPA): Update on Bisphenol A (BPA) for Use in Food: January 2010”
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm064437.htm

 

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This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, 133 Rollins Avenue, Suite 5, Rockville, MD 20852, phone 1-87-Platelet, fax: 301-770-6638, web: www.pdsa.org, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

To unsubscribe: send an email to: info@pdsa.org and place ‘remove’ in the subject line. To change your e-mail address, send an e-mail with your old and new address to: info@pdsa.org

Read more...

Platelet E-News – January 28, 2010

This e-newsletter is a monthly publication of the Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

ITP Research and Treatments

Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

General Health and Medicine

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ITP Research and Treatments

 

POTENTIAL NEW ITP TREATMENT APPROACH: BLOCKING B-CELL ACTIVATING FACTOR

 

People with active ITP have more B-Cell activating factor (BAFF), a substance that stimulates B-cell (a type of white blood cells) replication, than ITP patients in remission or those without the disease, according to researchers in China. When researchers added BAFF to platelets in a test tube the number of platelets decreased. When they inhibited BAFF, platelets increased. They conclude that blocking BAFF could be a promising approach to treating ITP.

Semple, JW. “ITP has elevated BAFF expression” Blood 2009, Dec 17; 114 (26): 5248-9

Zhu, XJ, et al. “The effects of BAFF and BAFF-R-Fc fusion protein in immune thrombocytopenia” Blood. 2009 Dec 17; 114 (26):5362-7

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19794139

 

 

NEW DATA TO HELP PREVENT INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE IN CHILDREN

 

Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in children diagnosed with ITP is rare, occurring in less than one percent of patients, however, it can be fatal and important to prevent. Researchers examined 40 cases of ICH in children and found that almost half happened within the first week of diagnosis. Blood in the urine, head trauma, and a very low platelet count were also factors in predicting ICH.

Lambert, MP. “Childhood ITP: knowing when to worry?” Blood, 2009 Nov 26; 114 (23): 4758-9

Psaila, B, et al. “Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): study of 40 cases” Blood. 2009 Nov 26; 114 (23):4777-83

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19767509

 

 

EUROPEAN MEDICINES AGENCY GIVES POSITIVE OPINION FOR REVOLADE® (ELTROMBOPAG) FOR TREATING ITP IN ADULTS

 

The European Medicines Agency’s (EMEA) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) issued a positive opinion for Revolade ® (eltrombopag) to treat ITP in adults. CHMP recommends its use in treating thrombocytopenia in chronic ITP adult patients who do not respond to corticosteroids or immunoglobulins, have had a splenectomy, or for whom a splenectomy is not a good treatment choice. Eltromobopag is a pill that stimulates platelet production and goes by the trade name Promacta ® in the US.

www.pipelinereview.com (search on Revolade)

 

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Hospitals, Insurance, and Medical Care

 

HIGHER DEATH RISK FOUND FOR UNINSURED ADULTS

 

Adults lacking health insurance have a much higher risk of dying than those with private insurance, reported researchers from Harvard Medical School after examining the records of patients (ages 17 to 64) in a large patient database. This conclusion is consistent with the results in older studies although medical technology and patient demographics have changed.

Wilper et al, “Health insurance and mortality in US adults” Am J Public Health. 2009 Dec; 99 (12):2289-95.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19762659

 

 

NIH OFFERS WEB SITE TAILORED TO HEALTH NEEDS OF SENIORS

 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has a new Web site that provides information about diseases and conditions that are often associated with seniors as well as suggestions to promote healthy aging. The new site also includes information on complementary and alternative treatments, used by two-thirds of people over 50 according to NIH statistics.

http://nihseniorhealth.gov/

 

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General Health and Medicine

 

PESTICIDE EXPOSURE RAISES RISK FOR ABNORMAL BLOOD CONDITION MGUS

 

A study of 678 people who apply pesticides found adults over 50 were twice as likely to develop MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) as those in the general population. MGUS is a pre-cancerous disease resulting in an abnormal level of M protein in the blood. MGUS can also lead to low platelets and has been associated with some cases of ITP.

Landgren O, “Pesticide exposure and risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in the Agricultural Health Study.” Blood. 2009 Jun 18; 113 (25):6386-91.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19387005

Rossi D, et al. “Prevalence and clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a cohort of monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance.” Br J Haematol. 2007 Jul; 138 (2):249-52

 

 

NEW HEALTH WARNINGS FOR COUCH POTATOES

 

Adults who watched TV more than four hours per day had an 80 percent higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and a 46 percent higher risk of death from all causes than their counterparts who watched television less than two hours per day. To reach these conclusions, researchers in Australia examined the records of 8,800 adults over 24 and adjusted the data for age, sex, waist circumference, and exercise. While the study focused on watching TV, the findings suggest that sitting for extended periods of time may pose a health risk.

Dunstan, et al. “Television Viewing Time and Mortality. The Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab)” Circulation, January 11, 1010

http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.894824v1

 

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This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, 133 Rollins Avenue, Suite 5, Rockville, MD 20852, phone 1-87-Platelet, fax: 301-770-6638, web: www.pdsa.org, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

To unsubscribe: send an email to: info@pdsa.org and place ‘remove’ in the subject line. To change your e-mail address, send an e-mail with your old and new address to: info@pdsa.org

Read more...

Platelet E-News – December 3, 2001

December 3, 2001

Platelet e-news – December 3, 2001

 

This e-newsletter is a publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  • PDSA Happenings
  • Serotonin Drugs and Platelets
  • Beating the Blues
  • Anthrax and TTP
  • ITP Herbal Treatment

 

PDSA HAPPENINGS

Newsletter:

We took our newsletter to the post office and it’s on its way to our members. It’s not too late to receive your copy. We will send the Fall 01 newsletter to our members who join or renew before the end of the year.

Our newsletter is sent to everyone who contributes at least $25 per year to PDSA. For more information and to join PDSA go to http://www.pdsa.org/joinus.htm. You can join on-line or send a check or credit card number to PDSA, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD 20859

Survey:

We will close the survey at the end of December so we can add the latest answers and analyze the data. Every answer counts. We would like to get as many responses as possible so each category has sufficient data to give us meaningful results. Be sure to complete our survey at: http://www.pdsa.org/survey/

Thank you.

ASH Conference:

Several of us will be attending the American Society of Hematology conference in Orlando, Florida. The conference is from Dec. 7 – 10. PDSA will have a booth there (1183). 

We will attend as many of the sessions and read as many of the posters as possible. We will also meet the ITP researchers, pharmaceutical representatives and physicians interested in ITP. Then we will share what we learn with you via our next e-newsletter and our printed news. Stay tuned.

SEROTONIN DRUGS AND PLATELETS

The headline in the November 2001 issue of Hem/Onc today reads, “Serotonin drugs may help after heart attack; they inhibit platelet activity” 

Researchers at Johns Hopkins studied a group of patients who underwent elective coronary artery stenting. They noticed that those who were treated for depression with SSRI’s had less platelet activity than those who did not. 

SSRI’s are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. They ease depression by keeping more of the body’s serotonin circulating in the blood stream. SSRI’s include Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Luvox, and Celexa along with sister drug, Serafem. The mechanisms for the SSRI and platelet connection are still unidentified although they don’t appear to inhibit platelet activity in the same way as some other known compounds.

For more information on the seratonin/depression/platelet connection see our Summer, 1999 newsletter at http://www.pdsa.org/newsletter.htm.

BEATING THE BLUES

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD is a type of depression that may set in as the days become shorter and our relationship with the sun becomes more transient. According to Dr. Andrew Weil, lack of sunlight may also decrease levels of serotonin, the neurotransmitter that influences mood. 

In Dr. Weil’s newsletter, SAD expert George Brainard of Thomas Jefferson University suggests the following lifestyle changes to help beat the SAD blues. 

  • Seek out natural light – sit near a window, spend time outdoors, take a vacation in the sun (When I was ill I replaced all the light bulbs in my home with the full spectrum variety. They added a wonderful glow. Ed.)
  • Get moving – exercise, preferably outdoors
  • Relax – breathe deeply, meditate, do yoga
  • Don’t overeat – recognize cravings for sweets and carbohydrates, then breathe deeply to distract them.

 

ANTHRAX AND TTP

The New York Times reported today that Leroy Richmond, a postal worker treated for Anthrax also developed what they suspected was TTP. TTP, like ITP is a low platelet disorder, however, it is much more likely to be fatal if not treated. Although the doctors felt that his low platelet condition was linked to anthrax they couldn’t be sure. The hospital treated Mr. Richmond with a combination of steroids and plasmapheresis and he is doing well.

For the New York Times article go to: www.nytimes.com and search on anthrax and TTP.

For information on TTP go to http://moon.ouhsc.edu/jgeorge/TTP.html

HOLIDAY SUGGESTIONS

Want an unusual gift for the holidays? Shop the Platelet Store. We have T-shirts, tote bags, zip duffels, vegetable knives, personalized note cards, platelet buddies, and more. Just go to http://www.itppeople.com/store/. 

Do you shop at Amazon? If you do, just click to Amazon through our site http://www.pdsa.org, http://www.itppeople.com/, or http://www.itppeople.com/store and PDSA will receive 5-15% of your purchase price. You pay no more and PDSA gets a welcome donation. Here’s our direct link: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/redirect-home/itppeopleplace

Shop IGIVE. If you shop the GAP on-line or LLBean, or any one of more than 200 affiliated stores, go to IGIVE first and PDSA will receive 5 – 15% of your purchase price. Links are on the same pages as above or go direct to: http://www.igive.com/PDS

ITP HERBAL TREATMENT

(advertisement)

Get Well International is a company with over 40 years of research in its products by medical doctors and master herbalists. Dr. Ba Hoang’s medical thesis was on ITP. His supplements Blood-Well and Restor-Immune for ITP have been used successfully for many years. A healthy balanced body produces normal platelet counts. Many users of this program report less bruising, more energy, and platelet increase within 2-3 weeks. It is very cost effective and has had almost no side effects like the normal drug therapies. Information and testimonials can be found at http://www.getwellinternational.com or leave a message at 1-888-522-4372.


For information on advertising in our e-news letter contact us at pdsa@pdsa.org.

This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD, 20859, phone/fax: 1-87-Platelet or (301) 294-5967, web: http://www.pdsa.org/, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

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Platelet E-News – December 17, 2001

December 17, 2001

Platelet e-news – December 17, 2001

This e-newsletter is a publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  • ITP Survey: Last Chance
  • American Society of Hematology Meeting: A Brief Report
  • More ASH information
  • Holiday Greetings
Read more...

Platelet E-News - November 5, 2001

November 5, 2001

Platelet e-news – November 5, 2001

 

This e-newsletter is a publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  • Fall Newsletter
  • ITP Conference 2002
  • Survey Update
  • Cipro, Doxycycline and Platelets
  • ITP Herbal Treatment

 

FALL NEWSLETTER

We are putting the finishing touches on the Fall edition of the Platelet News. This edition will be 16 pages, 4 pages longer than our last issues. We thank the support of our advertisers and volunteers who made this possible.

The newsletter will include the following:

  • Highlights from the ITP Conference 2001:Part 2 – Summaries of the following presentations: “Physiology of ITP” by Dr. John Freedman, “Implications of Splenectomy” by Dr.William Bell, “ITP and the National Institutes of Health” by Dr. Pan Ganguly, and “ITP and Pregnancy” by Dr. Daniel Skupski. If you missed the conference, here’s a chance to catch up on the latest in ITP.
  • Lara’s Story: Using Traditional Chinese Medicine to Treat ITP – Part 2. Sophie Bouris is an acupuncturist. She also studies Chinese Medicine. Follow her as she applies Chinese medicine theories in the treatment of her daughter’s ITP.
  • Abstracts of Interest – Medical journal abstracts on the morbidity and mortality of ITP, antiphospholipid syndrome in patients with ITP, and inherited thrombocytopenia.
  • Your Questions Answered – Four of your questions answered by some of the speakers at our last conference.
  • In the News – In the News: A compendium of news clips and recent findings that impact our health and our future.
  • And more….Message from the President, Letters, Tip from the Platelet Buddy, Information about the conference…. 

Our newsletter is sent to everyone who contributes at least $25 per year to PDSA. For more information and to join PDSA go to http://www.pdsa.org/joinus.htm. You can join on-line or send a check or credit card number to PDSA, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD 20859. To renew your membership, just use the same forms and procedure as you would when joining for the first time. When we process the membership we can tell that it is a renewal. If you are a current member…thank you. 

PDSA is a 501 (c ) 3 organization. All contributions are tax deductible.

Newsletters are sent via US mail to our US and Canadian members, e-mail to others. Due to the delays in processing the mail we will send an e-mail version of our Fall newsletter to all our members in addition to the paper copies.

ITP CONFERENCE 2002

We’ve finalized the time and location for our 2002 ITP Conference. It will be held at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley on June 21-23, 2002. Plan your vacation now! 

Our conference will feature top researchers and alternative practitioners plus a chance to meet old friends and make some new ones. 

We’ll have a short meeting on Friday evening, a day similar to our last conference on Saturday, and another meeting on Sunday morning. We have commitments from some of the speakers and are working on finalizing the agenda.

The Marriott in Mission Valley is easy to reach, affordable, and near all of the exciting things San Diego has to offer.

There is so much more to say. Stay tuned to the discussion group, our web site and our Platelet e-news letters for agenda details and registration information as they become available.

SURVEY PROGRESS

We have 500 replies to our survey. Thanks to all who have taken the time to complete the survey. There is a wealth of data and our initial analysis points to some very interesting results.

We need your help. We’d like to have 1000 replies. If you haven’t done so, please complete the survey at http://www.pdsa.org/survey/. Your identification information is optional. Only aggregate results will be published.

CIPRO, DOXYCYCLINE AND PLATELETS

With Cipro and Doxycycline in the news, many of us wonder what will happen to our platelets if we take these antibiotics. According to Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine and the USPDI Drug Information for Healthcare professionals, Cipro is not on the list as a common inducer of thrombocytopenia. However, the 2001 PDR Nurse’s Drug Handbook does list GI bleeding and urethral bleeding among the many potential side-effects. 

The Food and Medications Interactions – 11th edition recommends avoiding milk, yogurt and caffeine when taking Cipro. The Herb-Drug Interaction Handbook suggests that fennel oil alters the absorption. For more information on Cipro see http://www.ciprousa.com/hcp.asp

Doxycycline is a type of tetracycline, a group of broad spectrum antibiotics. The 2001 PDR Nurse’s Drug Handbook lists thrombocytopenia and thrombocytopenic purpura among the side effects of tetracyclines. The Food and Medications Interactions, 11th edition recommends you avoid alcohol if you take doxycycline. The Herb-Drug Interaction Handbook suggests Goldenseal and Oregon Grape can reduce the absorption. For more information see: http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/doxycyc.htm

ITP HERBAL TREATMENT

(advertisement)

Get Well International is a company with over 40 years of research in its products by medical doctors and master herbalists. Dr. Ba Hoang’s medical thesis was on ITP. His supplements Blood-Well and Restor-Immune for ITP have been used successfully for many years. A healthy balanced body produces normal platelet counts. Many users of this program report less bruising, more energy, and platelet increase within 2-3 weeks. It is very cost effective and has had almost no side effects like the normal drug therapies. Information and testimonials can be found at http://www.getwellinternational.com or leave a message at 1-888-522-4372.


For information on advertising in our e-news letter contact us at pdsa@pdsa.org.

This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD, 20859, phone/fax: 1-87-Platelet or (301) 294-5967, web: http://www.pdsa.org/, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

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Platelet E-News - November 20, 2001

November 20, 2001

Platelet e-news – November 20, 2001

 

This e-newsletter is a publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  •  PDSA Happenings
  •  Ethanol-induced thrombocytopenia
  •  Promising Research
  •  NIH Funding
  •  Holiday suggestions
  •  ITP Herbal Treatment

 

PDSA HAPPENINGS

Newsletter:

We’re taking the Fall newsletter to the printer tomorrow and sending it next week. It is 16 pages, longer than any previous newsletter, thanks to our sponsors and volunteers.

The newsletter will include the following: Highlights from the ITP Conference 2001:Part 2, Lara’s Story: Using Traditional Chinese Medicine to Treat ITP – Part 2; Abstracts of Interest, Your Questions Answered, In the News, and more….Message from the President, Letters, Tip from the Platelet Buddy, Information about the conference….

Our newsletter is sent to everyone who contributes at least $25 per year to PDSA. For more information and to join PDSA go to http://www.pdsa.org/joinus.htm. You can join on-line or send a check or credit card number to PDSA, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD 20859

Conference: 

Register Now! Our ITP Conference 2002 will be held at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, CA, June 21-23, 2002. The cost is $75 for non-members and $65 for members. Register before March 31, 2002 and receive a $10 discount. The Friday evening meeting is an additional $15. You can register and find the latest conference information at http://www.pdsa.org/conference.htm. It will be an exciting time! 

Survey:

Dr. James Bussel, Buzz (our VP and survey statistician) and I met to review the preliminary results. We agreed there is tremendous promise to increase the knowledge about ITP treatments with the data we are collecting. We will do a short presentation at Dr. Robert McMillan’s ITP study group meeting at the ASH conference in early December.

We will remove the survey from the web site at the end of this year so we can analyze the results. If you haven’t done so, be sure to take the survey. Every answer counts. http://www.pdsa.org/survey/

ETHANOL-INDUCED THROMBOCYTOPENIA

In each issue, the Hem/Onc Today magazine presents a diagnostic quiz. In the November, 2001 issue they described a woman, heavy drinker, who came to her physician with a mouth full of petechiae, extensive bruising and a low platelet count. Sound familiar?

After many tests she was diagnosed with ethanol-induced thrombocytopenia. Her alcohol intake had suppressed her bone marrow function and she wasn’t making very many platelets.

According to the author, Franklin Bunn, MD, “The most common causes of decreased production of platelets include drugs, particular chemotherapeutic agents…, and toxins, the most common of which is ethanol.

For a list of substances that could cause problems for people with ITP see http://www.itppeople.com/warnings.htm

PROMISING RESEARCH

MacroGenics, a new company in Rockville, MD is developing a promising antibody therapy. “The antibody we're engineering has 10,000 times more potency compared to IVIg, claims MacroGenics' CEO and president Dr. Scott Koenig, based on animal studies. In addition, he says, the company's product presumably will be safer and cheaper than IVIg and may work in patients for whom IVIg fails. It probably will be administered as a shot, rather than as an intravenous infusion like IVIg, which can take several hours, he adds.”

For more information see: http://www.washtech.com/news/biotech/13648-1.html (Thanks to John for sending us this news item)

NIH FUNDING

Dr. Claude Lenfant, NHLBI Director stated that the NHLBI (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute) is operating under a continuing resolution until Congress approves the budget. Regarding the FY 2003 budget, Dr. Lenfant stated that President Bush has publicly committed to complete the plan to double the NIH budget that was initiated during the previous administration. For more information see: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/meetings/index.htm. 

(NHLBI is the institute at the NIH that funds ITP research)

HOLIDAY SUGGESTIONS

Want an unusual gift for the holidays? Shop the Platelet Store. We have T-shirts, tote bags, zip duffels, vegetable knives, personalized note cards, platelet buddies, and more. Just go to http://www.itppeople.com/store/. 

Do you shop at Amazon? If you do, just click to Amazon through our site(http://www.pdsa.org, http://www.itppeople.com/, or http://www.itppeople.com/store/) and PDSA will receive 5-15% of your purchase price. You pay no more and PDSA gets a welcome donation. Here’s our direct link: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/redirect-home/itppeopleplace

Shop IGIVE. If you shop the gap on-line or LLBean, or any one of more than 200 affiliated stores, go to IGIVE first and PDSA will receive 5 – 15% of your purchase price. Links are on the same pages as above or go direct to: http://www.igive.com/PDSA

ITP HERBAL TREATMENT

(advertisement)

Get Well International is a company with over 40 years of research in its products by medical doctors and master herbalists. Dr. Ba Hoang’s medical thesis was on ITP. His supplements Blood-Well and Restor-Immune for ITP have been used successfully for many years. A healthy balanced body produces normal platelet counts. Many users of this program report less bruising, more energy, and platelet increase within 2-3 weeks. It is very cost effective and has had almost no side effects like the normal drug therapies. Information and testimonials can be found at http://www.getwellinternational.com or leave a message at 1-888-522-4372.


For information on advertising in our e-news letter contact us at pdsa@pdsa.org.

This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD, 20859, phone/fax: 1-87-Platelet or (301) 294-5967, web: http://www.pdsa.org/, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

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Platelet E-News - October 22, 2001

October 22, 2001

Platelet e-news - October 22, 2001

 

This e-newsletter is a publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  • Help ITP research - complete our survey
  • New NIH Research initiative
  • Prepare for the winter cold season
  • Web site news update
  • ITP Herbal Treatment

 

HELP ITP RESEARCH - COMLETE OUR SURVEY

The Platelet Disorder Support Association and Dr. James Bussel, MD of the Weill Medical Center of Cornell University are collaborating on an historic survey entitled "Survey of Non-Traditional Treatments of ITP." While most ITP research articles are based on findings of fewer than 100 patients, we hope to get input from more than 1,000 patients with ITP. This large amount of data will allow us to find patterns in treatments and treatment successes that have not been available to date. The survey results could lead to a follow-up study to gain verification of the most promising treatments.

To meet our goals we need your help. Please complete our survey at http://www.pdsa.org/survey/. Your name, address, and e-mail information are optional. No data will be shared with anyone outside of PDSA or those associated with Weill Medical Center. Only aggregate data will be published.

NEW NIH RESEARCH INITIATIVE

"…National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has released a Request for Applications (RFA) on a new Transfusion Medicine/Hemostasis Clinical Research Network available for review at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-02-001.html. ASH has long advocated for increased federal funding of clinical research initiatives in benign hematology and applauds the NHLBI's decision to support this area of research. The new NHLBI network will support up to sixteen core centers and a data-coordinating center to perform clinical trials to evaluate and compare novel and existing management strategies and products in the treatment of benign hematologic disorders in both children and adults. The total project period will be no longer than 10 years, with an anticipated award date of September 30, 2002…" (American Society of Hematology Press Release, September 25, 2001. http://www.hematology.org/news/press/press_0901.cfm)

ITP is one of the hematologic disorders targeted in this research initiative. We applaud the NIH for its increased support and stand ready to do anything we can to assist the ITP researchers who apply for these clinical research funds.

PREPARE FOR THE WINTER COLD SEASON

Many people with ITP notice a susceptibility to sinus infections. We’ve found an easy way to help prevent them, just rinse your nasal passages daily with a warm salt water solution. The salt rinse helps prevent bacteria from multiplying in the sinus passages. Your sinuses have a mini-immune system and they need to be open for this to function effectively.

Although you can rinse the sinuses by a number of methods, the best and most effective way is with a Neti pot, a specially shaped container that allows water to pour freely into the sinus cavities. You can purchase them in many health food stores, or from us in the Platelet Store, http://www.itppeople.com/store. The cost for the our plastic or ceramic versions is $17.95 plus shipping, reduced from $19.95.

Join me and hundreds of satisfied and healthier ITP people in using this simple preventative technique.

"Of 85 patients with chronic post nasal drip…were 79 cases that were markedly improved (by daily irrigation at home) so that symptoms ceased and further treatment was unnecessary." - Max Unger, MD, from an article in The Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Monthly.

See further testimonials on our store pages.

WEB SITE NEWS UPDATE

We’ve implemented a new way to update the ITP news section of our web site and make the back versions of the e-newsletters available or those who missed them. Each issue of our e-news will be posted to the news section of our web site: http://www.itppeople.com/itpnews.htm.

ITP HERBAL TREATMENT

(advertisement)

Get Well International is a company with over 40 years of research in its products by medical doctors and master herbalists. Dr. Ba Hoang’s medical thesis was on ITP. His supplements Blood-Well and Restor-Immune for ITP have been used successfully for many years. A healthy balanced body produces normal platelet counts. Many users of this program report less bruising, more energy, and platelet increase within 2-3 weeks. It is very cost effective and has had almost no side effects like the normal drug therapies. Information and testimonials can be found at http://www.getwellinternational.com or leave a message at 1-888-522-4372.


For information on advertising in our e-news letter contact us at pdsa@pdsa.org.

This e-newsletter is published by the Platelet Disorder Support Association, P.O. Box 61533, Potomac, MD, 20859, phone/fax: 1-87-Platelet or (301) 294-5967, web: http://www.pdsa.org/, e-mail: pdsa@pdsa.org

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Platelet E-News - October 8, 2001

October 8, 2001

Platelet e-news - October 8, 2001

 

This newsletter is a publication of The Platelet Disorder Support Association. The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only. For advice on your unique medical condition, please consult a health care professional.

Contents:

  • ASH Meeting Information 
  • New Levels of Membership
  • Help us. Help others
  • About our New E-mail Format
  • Advertising with PDSA

 

ASH MEETING INFORMATION

The 43rd annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) will be held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL from December 7 - 11, 2001. The good news is that you don’t have to be a hematologist to attend.

On Friday, December 7, the "Third Annual Review of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura" will take place from 12:00 noon to 4:00 PM in the Rosen Centre Hotel, near the Convention Center. If the third program is anything like the first two, you can expect to see a very large room filled with eager attendees listening to presentations from some of the top ITP researchers.

Since this is a ‘Corporate Friday’ program it is open to all who are interested in attending. You don’t need to register for the conference or call ahead to attend this session. Just be there. The ITP review is sponsored by the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Nabi. Keep in mind that the target audience is physicians.

There will be an education program on platelets during the regular session of the ASH meeting. It is chaired by Keith McCrae. MD, from Case Western Reserve University and includes his presentation on "Pregnancy-Associated Thrombocytopenia" as well as talks by James Bussel, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital, on "Novel Approaches to Management of ITP:Results from Recent Trials", Pier Mannucci, MD, University of Milan, "Diagnostic and Pathophysiologic Significance of the VWF Protease in Thrombotic Microangiopathies", and Douglas Cines, MD, University of Pennsylvania on "Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis: New Insights into Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management". You need to register for the conference to attend this and other ASH education sessions.

The Platelet Disorder Support Association will have a booth at the meeting and representatives from PDSA will be attending these sessions. We will publish highlights from the meeting in an e-mail and print more information in our newsletter. We are pleased to be able to attend this meeting and share what we learn with our readers.

If you are planning to go to the Corporate Friday session or the entire meeting, please let us know via e-mail or call 1-87-Platelet. We have 2 passes to the exhibit floor we can share and the option of including more volunteers to staff our booth.

To find out more about the American Society of Hematology Meeting go to http://www.hematology.org

NEW LEVELS OF MEMBERSHIP

The PDSA Board of Directors has approved two new levels of memberships, Contributors at $100 and Associates at $250.00. Contributors will receive our newly printed PDSA Tote Bag in addition to all the benefits of our ‘Friends of PDSA’. Associates will receive a PDSA Zip Duffel in addition to all the benefits of being a Contributor. You can now contribute on-line in these additional categories at http://www.pdsa.org/joinus.htm.

Please consider upgrading your support to PDSA. We can do more with your help.

The Platelet Disorder Support Association is a 501 (c ) 3 organization.

All contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

HELP US. HELP OTHERS

Our thoughts continue to be with those who were touched by the tragic events on September 11. As the turmoil continues, we all want to give as much as we can to help those in need as we try to maintain the life we knew. In this spirit, the Platelet Disorder Support Association will donate 10% of all profits from the Platelet Store and memberships to the Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund.

NEW E-MAIL FORMAT

We’ve sure you’ve noticed the change in format from the other e-mails you have received from us. We’re standardizing our e-mails and adding some features we think you’ll appreciate, making them more like other e-newsletters.

Our plan is to send them every two weeks, on a Monday. In each, we want to include some helpful ITP information in addition to product and service announcements. We’ve also added advertisements. We’d appreciate any comments on this new format and timing. Just send them to news@pdsa.org.

ADVERTISING WITH PDSA

PDSA will now be accepting advertising in our newsletter and in these e-newsletter messages. We are doing this for several reasons. One, the obvious, advertising dollars allow us to do more. Our next newsletter will have more pages due to the generosity of our advertisers.

Another reason we are accepting advertising is that some companies contacted us and wanted us to help them tell you about their products and services. We feel these products could be beneficial to you and you would want to hear about them too. It was a good match and the right time for us. We will be accepting advertising on our web site soon.

If you or your company are interested in placing an ad with us, just call us at 1-87-Platelet or e-mail at pdsa@pdsa.org. The ads in our paper newsletter must pertain to ITP and wellness. This is a requirement to maintain our non-profit postal rate. We can be more flexible with the content of our e-newsletter and web site ads. However, we would like all of our advertising to be potentially beneficial to our readers.

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